IBI Watch 9/29/13

29 09 2013

Too Late or Not Too Late?

The latest assessment from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) offers plenty of evidence for both arguments – that it is already past the time where we can solve our manmade climate crisis, or that we still have time to mitigate and reverse it. But some things are clear in all the projections – human activity is altering the climate, the trends are not favorable, and we are pushing the climate towards the point where it will be too late to do anything.

The new IPCC report – its fifth and first since 2007 – certainly offers some openings for denialists. It acknowledges the fact that our uncontrolled experiment in altering the climate with our greenhouse gases is not a linear process. It also fine-tunes some predictions from previous assessments, and in some cases suggests that prior predictions – at least for now through 2100 – may have been too steep. But for all but the most die-hard denialists (think of tobacco executives in the 1960s or maybe of Baghdad Bob as US forces invaded Iraq in 2003), the message is clearer than ever – we are steadily raising atmospheric carbon dioxide, which is warming the planet and altering the oceans and the entire planetary climate system.

Thanks to various media outlets, getting the gist of the latest from this conservative, consensus-bound body does not require poring through hundreds of footnoted pages. Here is an overview pdf. It runs more than 30 pages, but is actually quite easy to surf. Just look for the orange-shaded paragraphs. When you do, you will see that the report contains little good news. The vaunted (by denialists) “slowdown” or “pause” in warming noticed over the past 15 years? It’s a natural variation, and an indication that the heat is being absorbed by the deep oceans. (Want to know more about ocean heating? See here.)Not all the recent heat is ocean-bound, of course (only about 90 percent!), but all that heat will eventually warm the atmosphere. And even with the ocean’s shielding the atmosphere – for now – from the most serious heating, we still have the dramatic retreat of glaciers, ice sheets and the Arctic sea ice.

To learn more, try one or more of these:

A summary from the NPR blog

A report at the Economist’s blog site

A summary reported by Reuters

A fine summary posted by Joe Romm at the Climate Progress site

A set of graphics posted at Climate Central

There is always another choice – learn less, think magically, insert head into sand or other dark space. This Buzzfeed collection of familiar denialist assertions can help in that regard. It even has brief video samples attached for entertainment value. And of course you can read variants of those and others in the comment section following virtually all postings on climate change. In fact, another came to my attention recently – the one about human activity (the 90 million tons of CO2 we send skyward every day) being dwarfed by volcanoes. Here is a fact-based debunker of that canard. And all those comments bring up one of the challenges in moving policy on climate and energy in a sustainable direction. Public perception of science is found to be affected by all the rants of trolls and thinkers who know more than the world’s scientists. Though I am not particularly fond of Popular Science – they don’t cover my favorite issues anywhere near as often as Scientific American, Discover and National Geographic – I want to relay  a step that magazine felt necessary. That is, remove the comment platform for the anti-scientists, “skeptics” and denialists. It really has come to that. And reader comments are not the only source of anti-science propaganda. When it comes to media, we have to consider the source, particularly these oily headwaters.

There are people who are committed to climate science and climate policy, and then there is Kumi Naidoo. The executive director of Greenpeace – an organization I support – appeared on Moyers and Company this week. A veteran of daring protests that have led to grave physical danger and arrests, this is someone who puts his personal safety on the line in defense of a livable planet. I like his rhyming mantra – “Leave the coal in the hole, and the oil in the soil,” and also his call to action – “If we can mobilize trillions to bail out banks, bankers, bonuses, surely we can mobilize much less than that to deal with the climate crisis.” Naidoo’s take on the “too late/not too late” question is also right on. That is, it is too late for people already in the bull’s eye of sea rise and ice melt. We need to act and act forcefully to make sure it does not get too late for all humanity. That time is just about upon us.

A “Ted Talk” that Speaks Volumes

You may be able to find a complete recording of the recent “Ted-athon” on the Senate floor, but you will need to order several pizzas and a case of No-Doz to make it through. Instead, I prescribe Jon Stewart’s two-part sampling of this spectacularly off-tune solo hypocrisy. In part one, Stewart hits the “high” points of Senator Ted Cruz’s not-a filibuster. And in part two, he latches onto the senator’s cultural contribution, in which he uses the podium to read Dr. Seuss’ famous Green Eggs and Ham, allegedly to his daughter. Ten minutes of hilarious satire or 21 hours of glazed eyes and nausea. Choose wisely. And remember, this guy wants to be president.

I have a couple of points to make here. First, this display continues a not-so-proud Republican tradition of having a tin ear for culture. Remember Michele Bachmann and American Girl? How about Ronald Reagan and Born in the USA? And though it was not as public, my favorite story in this regard is President George W Bush’s alleged affinity for the songs of Creedence Clearwater Revival. The question is, did he understand or even listen to Fortunate Son? Yes, as Snopes points out, the song was not about President W but was there ever a more fortunate son? Second, the good Senator seems to have forgotten that Theodore Geisel (i.e. Dr. Seuss) was a staunch liberal. And most important of all, what is the point of that immortal kids’ book in the first place? Try it, you’ll like it. Uber-blogger Tom Degan makes that point in his imitable way right here.

There are two things I would like you to remember here, as we head, seemingly inexorably, toward yet another pigheaded government shutdown. First, Senator Ted Cruz, playing to the Tea Party extremists who increasingly control his party, is a health-care hypocrite of the first order. (That’s not saying he is alone in that regard.) And second, keep in mind that this tea-addled majority in the House, that is willing to risk shutting down the government, and not long after that, defaulting on the debts that the US government accrued on both Republican and Democratic watch, is a gerrymandered, phony majority. So get this – an extremist minority within a party that is actually a minority itself is acting completely contrary to the will of the American people. And this is a group that purportedly opposes tyranny. Folks, you just can’t make this up.

Nerds Can’t Dance

Or maybe they just shouldn’t. When I watched this video of Bill Nye the Science Guy dancing and ultimately tripping up, injured, on Dancing with the Stars, I was reminded of some movie scene. It was the hair – Tom Hulce, playing Mozart in one of my all-time favorite flicks, Amadeus. But I digress. The Science Guy’s knee injury looks painful but, thank goodness, not career threatening. Get right quick, Bill. We need you to do more stuff like this, this and this. And hey, break a leg. Or maybe not.

Food Rescued

It’s a downright scandal. Consider how much energy goes into creating our food, and then imagine this – 40 percent of food in America is wasted. News features recently have highlighted that shameful fact. Here is a fine example from the Los Angeles Times. The former president of Trader Joe’s has a better idea. It’s a combination store/restaurant that will offer food items that are just past those expiration dates, but still usable. Though Peter Sagal had a good old time with the idea on Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, here is hoping it sells.

Fix the Problem – Ten Ways

If asked to name the one problem to solve in order to create far-reaching, cascading positive change, I know what my answer would be. Get corporate hands off the levers of power. Their grip has been strengthening in recent years, thanks in no small part to the infamous Citizens United decision by the corporatocratic Supreme Court. Gar Alperovitz and Keane Bhatt have a wonderful, thought-provoking piece on Truthout. How many of these have you tried? It’s not too late . . . yet.

“I conceive that the land belongs to a vast family of which many are dead, few are living, and countless numbers are still unborn.” – A Chieftain from Nigeria

Contributed links to this posting – Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 9/15/13

15 09 2013

Arctic Refreeze + Slow Hurricane Season = Climate Change Bunk? //

It’s all the rage. The Arctic icepack will not set a new minimum record this year. It is already refreezing, fast. Those facts have climate science deniers energized. For instance, one of the most prominent of all the climate change denial sites has charts and graphs galore, telling this story that apparently proves climate change is not happening. This site has run pretty much the same story the last two years – see 2012 and 2011 entries. And it is not just pundits and bloggers – here is an established British news source with the same story.

True unbelievers in climate science take some kind of comfort, I guess, in news like the Arctic ice returning, plus this year’s near-record late start to the Atlantic hurricane season. Here is a balanced view of that hurricane situation, from Time magazine. Cherry-picked data serves as potent fuel for fantastical stories, as Rush Limbaugh regularly proves. And just as monthly Arctic ice stats serve some deniers, so have some other deniers seized on the late hurricane start as evidence that climate change activists are alarmists, to be ignored. Note – Taylor is a prime author for the oil-fueled Heartland Institute.

This is all familiar territory. It follows an established script. First, assert falsely that climate change as explained by scientists and science journalists is a perfectly linear process. Support that position with a few quotes, preferably speculative ones, by one or more of your demons – Al Gore or Bill McKibben, just to name two. Then, report your supportive data which undermines that inaccurate depiction of climate science. So you and the forces of do-nothingness win. Or do you?

These facts can’t be challenged. We pump 90 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every day. The current atmospheric carbon dioxide reading is 395 parts per million, compared to preindustrial levels of about 280. Both the daily and cumulative numbers continue to rise, with chaotic consequences that cannot be precisely predicted.

 

So what is happening now? In the hurricane realm, there are several possibilities. First, as Chris Mooney reports, climate change may actually reduce hurricanes. Of course, thanks to sea rise resulting from warmer oceans and melting ice sheets and glaciers, those hurricanes that do occur will have a head start. And with all the uncertainty, it is also possible that this season’s late start could itself be an anomaly.

As for the alleged return of the Arctic to its long-term solid, frozen status, don’t count on it. Time will prove the denialists wrong. It is only a matter of how fast things happen. For instance, the decidedly conservative, consensus-driven Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change comes out with its latest forecast in two weeks. Leaked information points to more certainty than ever. And though some evidence points to a lull in the temperature rise, our emission-driven acidification of the oceans proceeds. The Seattle Times’ Craig Welch put together a comprehensive article on acidification that includes several imbedded videos. And as for those who persist in their denial of scientific facts and projections, thus paralyzing policy, they will be justly recognized. As this Truthout piece suggests, we might think of them as the Dr. Kevorkians of the planet. Call it pignorance-assisted suicide.

 

Extremes in Two Mismatched Pairs

So the relationship between hurricanes and manmade climate change is unclear and hotly debated, and the ongoing experiment in liquefying the Arctic is crucial in its effect on weather patterns, not so crucial in sea rise. That’s because the ice, old and new alike, is already floating on the sea.

For a clear view of our climate-changed future, look to extremes today that are part of well-predicted trends. First there are increasingly common weather extremes. The Yosemite Rim fire, just about contained, is one example of an enhanced fire season, driven by higher temperatures and persistent drought. The latest shocking example is the horrific flooding and mudslides around Boulder, Colorado. As of this writing, four are confirmed dead, with hundreds unaccounted for. This disaster is caused by a triple-whammy series of drought, wildfire and finally, the knockout punch of monsoon-like storms that come and stay, dumping months or years worth of rain on the same sun-baked spot. Here are two videos from the Boulder environs – from Salina and Boulder itself. (Scroll down for the Boulder video.) Subhankar Banerjee effectively makes the case for climate change in the Colorado floods. And with the mangled jet stream causing all sorts of mayhem in weather patterns, Boulder-like events could be soon coming to a creek, stream or river near you.

And then there is the melting that really matters – the head-for-the-hills variety. That would be ice that resides on land, until it melts that is and slides into the rising sea. Two extreme locations, two similar stories. First there is Greenland, whose ice is described here by MPR meteorologist Paul Huttner as a “stick of butter in a hot pan.” In other words, it does not move at all for awhile, but then really starts to slip along seaward. Be sure to watch the short video on Greenland’s Mega Canyon. But what about the granddaddy of all ice sheets, Antarctica? If you guessed “accelerated melting, you get the extra credit points. Read here about research at the Pine Island Glacier, being undermined by warming ocean water. Here is 9/15 update from NPR on the same research. Did you catch the possible sea rise there? Six feet? See for yourself how that matters in this terrific interactive map from Climate Central.

So all of this manmade chaos and disruption really matters. But does it matter enough to motivate meaningful changes in energy and greenhouse gas policy? Not yet. But these groups are working hard to wake us up and tip the balance toward adaptation and sustainability – 350.org, the Climate Reality Project and Citizens Climate Lobby.

 

The Magical Techno Fix

This longstanding idea is often a slam at doomsayers of old – Thomas Malthus – or of more recent vintage – Paul Ehrlich. The idea is this – the earth’s capacity for human occupation is pretty much unlimited, nigh infinite. Hogwash, most ecologists say. But those who really believe in our technical ingenuity (and don’t much give a damn about our fellow travelers on this orb, i.e. any life form that is not human) persist in their sacred faith in technological innovation. Seldom in recent times has this view been given a more articulate or narrowly myopic presentation than in this Erle C. Ellis article in the New York Times. The problems that Ellis ignores or summarily dismisses in this column are too numerous to mention, but he does make at least one true statement – “In moving toward a better Anthropocene, the environment will be what we make it.” To which I would reply with words borrowed from Colin Powell: “If you break it, you own it.”

We have a lot of repairing to do, with or without technological wizardry. And to be fair, there is much more to Ellis’s ideas than this single article would indicate. See the linked video here.

As for the big picture, there is much to learn in National Geographic’s study of the world’s continued population growth. I also like the education and activism being done by Growthbusters, World Population Balance and the Population Connection. The more the merrier? No chance. The best strategy – educate the world’s women and support their family planning choices.

 

Plant It, and They Will Come?

We have invested much time and sweat in recent years replacing swaths of lawn with wild-looking native and rain gardens. Until this year, we attracted droves of large butterflies, including varieties of swallowtails and of course the lord of them all, monarchs. This year, we have seen exactly three swallowtails and not many more monarchs. In addition, our abundant milkweed shows no evidence of monarch eggs. An isolated, unfortunate incident? Not on your life.

This Minnesota Public Radio interview with the University of Minnesota’s Karen Oberhauser fingers two closely-related culprits – neo-nicotinoid pesticides, and modern factory agriculture’s penchant for decimating “unwanted” plants between the rows. That includes of course milkweed. She offers two remedies – plant more milkweed (maybe it will work for you) and be careful when buying garden plants from nurseries, who may have treated the plants with those magical modern poisons. But all of that means little when our government allows chemical companies such as Bayer and Monsanto to continue this campaign against the natural world. Congress has the power to stop this, if its members would for once think of the common good rather than their corporate sponsors.

 

A Hypocrisy Interview

I find that I have had the conversation described in this little article before. It serves to prove a long-held theory of mine. That is, that any ideology that purports to have all, or even most of, the answers to all the problems begins to look like a dogma, a religion. Magical thinking, that is. Unreal. Fantasy. Enjoy the script.

 

1227 Facts

There is a difference between trivia and curious, even meaningful facts. This is why I waste no time on trivia contests and collections, but love, for example Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me and the Harpers Index. This is precisely why a new book hit my reading list. Two of the three authors of 1227 Quite Interesting Facts to Blow Your Socks Off appeared on NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, interviewed by the great Scott Simon. Work is more dangerous than war, the most shoplifted book in the United States is the Bible, and there is an actual word for an affliction that awards the sufferer with feet the size of umbrellas. But the universe is not shaped like a bumbershoot. Try a vuvuzela. Enough said.

 

Shooting Each Other Some Love

Thanks to comic Sarah Silverman, we can fittingly celebrate two recent recall election victories by the fear-fueled National Rifle Association in Colorado. She has a modest proposal to make the country even “safer.”

 

Diplomacy Wins, for Now

Bill Moyers’ commentary highlights the power of public opinion in recent events concerning Syria. Collective common sense. What a concept.

 

“The great challenge of the twenty-first century is to raise people everywhere to a decent standard of living while preserving as much of the rest of life as possible.”
Edward O. Wilson

 

Contributed links to this posting – Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 8/4/13

4 08 2013

Climate Change Sinking In //

The article that headline calls out for goes like this. “Members of the US Congress, after decades of bickering and stalling, looked at the latest evidence of a planet altered by human-generated greenhouse gases, and decided, ‘Enough is enough. It is time for decisive steps.’ In other words, the science finally ‘sank in,’ and persuaded a critical mass of legislators, without regard to ideology, to respect the scientific findings and, at long last, enact world-leading policies to protect the planet for future generations.”

If only.

Sadly, what seems to be sinking in most deeply is warmer surface temperatures. And those are making things mighty interesting for now, mighty devastating in the not-so-distant future. Here are just a couple of examples of what I am describing. First, Arctic sea ice coverage is headed down into record territory again this summer. And the result is surface lakes of meltwater on top of the sea ice. But those are now breaking through the ice, sinking in to lower ice levels. And guess what happens then. Hint – refreezing is NOT what happens – even for this temporary lake at the North Pole.  That’s right, a “lake” exactly at the northernmost spot on this rapidly warming planet. So that is melting sinking through sea ice, which is already floating and not a direct threat of rising ocean levels.

But the same thing is happening on land. In particular, Greenland. Watch this video and see the evidence that the melt is speeding up. This is not a theory of future change. It is solid scientific observation of accelerated melting.  Note the sea level rise loaded in the Greenland ice sheet – seven meters, i.e. 23 feet. That’s enough to create more than a few bad days in various coastal cities. OK, that is an understatement, as you can see.

And here is another way climate change “sinks in.” Sure, seems like a no-brainer – weather is hotter, patience wears thin, tempers flare . . . But now there is measurable evidence of that heating effect.

So what are our nation’s leaders doing to slow and stop this disaster that is playing out? Not much. Oh sure, they are busy. You can’t accuse the gerrymandered (i.e. phony GOP-majority) House of inconsistency. (BTW, I think that vote count is up to 40 now – your tax dollars hard at work, for the long haul.)

What Congress could be doing – if its members were not beholden to their favorite flavor of fossil fuel – would be to make carbon pay its way. And yes, that seems impossible right now, with the House in the hands of science deniers and the Senate always under threat of the modern, misused descendant of the filibuster whenever anything of substance is discussed. But give the president credit – he has made proposals to move the country in a positive direction, based on actions that do not require Congressional support. Of course, it is always wise to be skeptical – this AlterNet piece clearly explains that all the positive action to plan to reduce emissions bumps up against continuing extraction growth (for export and profits to Big Oil). And military adventures overseas cause massive emissions but don’t count in the US total.    New extractions exported for big profits but don’t count in emission totals.

But the climate crisis is an accelerating wave, with surprises waiting at each warming milepost on the way. For instance – formerly frozen methane making a grand and unwelcome appearance, as described in this lengthy but worthy article by Subhankar Banerjee (author of Arctic Voices).

I argue that America’s political system has evolved into a mass machine dedicated to one purpose – clearing the way for multinational corporations (which owe no allegiance to any nation) to act in a regulation-free world. Thanks to Tea Party Republicans, this is happening often by default – as explained by economist Paul Krugman. The only big-picture solution to progress on climate and so many other issues is this- get the corporate money out.

Here is one organization – the Get Money Out Foundation – dedicated to that purpose. And – as a point of hope – more people all the time are “getting it.”

Avoid Local Bias

Here in Minnesota right now, we are positively basking in calm, beautiful weather. Gentle sunshine, temperatures around or a few degrees below long-term averages, no extreme, severe storms. It almost puts manmade climate change out of your mind. It even gets people of a certain frame of mind to think, “Maybe things are not as bad as they say. Sure looks pretty normal for now.” Don’t bet on it.

How about a lingering European heat wave? Or maybe you prefer ridiculously warm temps in Alaska. Or maybe it’s the big burn out in the American West.

None of this should be surprising. Consider the long-term trend. The only thing that should surprise is our malingering lethargy on this issue, allowing the pignorant (pretend-ignorant) crowd – led by the likes of Senator Jim “Hoax” Inhofe – to hold sway.

Time to wake up.

Some are More Equal than Others

Consider how wealthy America is – per capita – compared to the rest of the world. On the three scales listed here, we are either number seven, six or eight. And when you compare us only to other modern western democracies, only Norway, Luxembourg and Switzerland surpass us. Keep that in mind as you consider three perspectives on relative well-being in our country.

First, consider this laundry list of world-leading reasons why we should think twice – or maybe eight times – before chanting “USA!”

  • Most expensive place to have a baby
  • Obesity
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Small arms ownership
  • Most people behind bars
  • Energy use per person
  • Health expenditures
  • Cocaine use

Makes me want to chant. Or maybe scream.

Second, consider where might be the best place to be born. Here is an index based on a variety of factors – GDP, literacy, life expectancy, etc. (You can see all the factors listed in one of the charts.) Remembering that the US trails only two or three western democracies in per-capita wealth, you would think we should score pretty high – at least in the top ten. But you would be wrong. What is especially troubling is that a scant 25 years ago, the results were starkly different. So what is going on here?

That would be the third factor. Recent studies have surveyed Americans on two aspects of relative wealth distribution in the country. Those are:

  • How they believe wealth is actually distributed among the public, divided into ten-percent sectors (top ten percent, second ten percent, etc.)
  • What would be a fair distribution of wealth among those sectors

This gets really interesting when compared to the way wealth is actually distributed among the ten sectors. I believe this is the best explanation – via video animation – of how this is playing out.

These trends are not good, they don’t result by accident, and they are not inevitable. I like Robert Reich’s concise video explanation, and his call for change for the better. I also like Jim Hightower’s quick audio tour of American exceptionalism, and his prescription for a better future – invest in the common good.

Framing the Debate

Heard about Sandy Hook recently? Some might say, “Sandy Hook? What’s that, a beach to visit?” Well, no, it is only the site of that awful school massacre just last December which, for a short time, generated some momentum for reasonable gun regulation. Things though have not only returned to what passes for normal, but such events seem to have spawned even more gun sales. Nothing seems to have changed in a country where a guy like this can be a police chief, make an outrageous video and be defended by powerful people as “just expressing his views on his own time.” One more good old town to stay away from.

Bill Maher makes a valid point on the weapons issue – today’s debate allows only center-to-right perspectives. While Wayne LaPierre continues to own Congress, it is always a sad but necessary exercise to check in on how many more have died in gun violence since the Sandy Hook massacre. I say we should listen to those whose lives have been shattered. And I ask – how many more Americans famous and otherwise will have to suffer the fate of the likes of Jim Brady, Gabrielle Giffords and Sami Rahamim to name just a few, before we summon the will to escape the gun lobby’s stranglehold on policy?

Big, Brave Policy Enforcers

You and I can’t imagine the courage and fortitude required to carry out the mission described at this link. This shining example of bold, decisive action will live on in the annals of government protecting the public against grave threats, under the heading “Policies are policies.”

You will read how the Department of Natural Resources did its sworn duty. But hey – considering the SWAT-team-like actions of the highly armed team makes me wonder – was this really the DNR?  After all, the federal government has a feared agency called the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF). Maybe – stay with me – the Dairy State has a new, shadowy, undercover agency called the WTF. That would be the bureau of, well, you get the idea. And maybe this quick strike was really designed to eliminate a laughing critic who dared to say – in her own way – that the state’s emperor has no clothes. Mission accomplished.

Hope for an Ethical Future

What a concept – holding the Supreme Court justices to high ethical standards. Too good to be true? Probably, but let’s dream on. Getting a bill introduced is at least a good start.

Heard this New Asian Band?

I have attended several concerts at the Minnesota Zoo – a great Twin Cities venue. But I have never seen anything like this. Mostly percussion, but it has its moments. Creates a new meaning for the term “big band.”

“There is two kinds of music, the good, and the bad. I play the good kind.”

-Louis Armstrong

 

Contributed links to this posting – Mary Colborn, Allyson Harper, Tammie Stadt

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 7/7/13

7 07 2013

The Fiction of Climate Change //

Though the scientific facts of what we are doing to the planet that sustains us are plenty scary, manmade climate change is a bonanza for fiction writers of a certain stripe. They dystopic potential is unparalleled. Just read the forecasts of a conservative assembly, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the future emerges. Two degrees of warming? Four? Six? The catastrophic possibilities are endlessly frightful.

The main purpose of the writers whose work is featured in this New Yorker article is not to capitalize on our catastrophic, uncontrolled science experiment. I wager a guess that each would admit to a “wake-up” purpose for their speculative fiction.

Take T. Coraghessan Boyle, whose excellent Friend of the Earth I can strongly recommend. I remember hearing an interview with this California author not long after the 2000 publication of this book, in which he complained that he had come under reader fire. These tone-deaf readers accused Boyle of being anti-environment. His retort – of course he is an environmentalist. All he did to create his fictional world of 25 years into the future (then) was to take current trends (which have only continued and accelerated in the intervening 13 years) and project them into a devastated future.

It is the same with novelist and nonfiction writer Barbara Kingsolver, whose book Flight Behavior takes on climate change as it affects the natural world. Her focus here is on monarch butterflies. Seen any of those this year? Me neither. And no article surveying apocalyptic and dystopic fiction would be worth its time for me unless it launched another book onto my reading list. Check. Nathaniel Rich’s The Odds Against Tomorrow looks very promising.

It was back in high school, in 1970s New York, when I first became enamored with dystopias and apocalyptic literature. I cut my dark-view teeth on A Clockwork Orange, Brave New World and 1984. (Thanks, Dr. Robert Englert!) But who could have foreseen 40 years ago that the reality we are creating, whether by bad choices or by no choices at all (let the markets decide, we are told) would end up as more compelling, more frightening, than the darkest visions of the best fiction writers? If we could only learn from, and not just be enthralled, entertained and shocked by Boyle, Kingsolver, Rich and Co., maybe we could move beyond fighting over the rudder as our planetary ship drifts faster and faster toward the waterfall.

Climate Change is no fiction, friends. How catastrophic will it be? Let’s just say it’s a real page-turner.

 

It’s Called Global Warming, After All

I rarely use the term “global warming” in my writing and conversation. Though the long-term trend is clearly warming – punctuated by glacier and ice-sheet melting, record-high temperatures overwhelming record lows, and historical evidence linking rising carbon dioxide levels with rising temperatures – the term is too easily manipulated by denialists who spotlight isolated contradictions. (“It’s cold! It’s snowing! Global warming? Al Gore’s fantasy!”) Paradoxically, the term “climate change” coined by right-wing spinmeister Frank Luntz is more accurately descriptive. I say paradoxically because Luntz’s well-paid purpose is not to arouse awareness about the climate crisis, but the contrary – to encourage resignation, lethargy and the like. It’s climate change, it’s natural, the climate is always changing, little ol’ humanity couldn’t be causing this, etc.

But the term global warming does have certain power. I was reminded of that power by some recent research. Since an outsized portion of the earth’s population centers are in the northern hemisphere, we naturally focus on the Arctic, where epochal change is already under way. Hardly a day goes by without more news of new lows in ice volume, storms melting ever more Arctic ice, and the like. Meanwhile, at the other end of the globe, the situation is different. Rather than a frozen ocean, we have ea massive continent, covered by ancient ice. And in fact, one oft-heard denialist cant is “Antarctic ice is increasing.” I found a fine example of this, written by that bastion of brilliant science, the editorial board at Investors’ Business Daily. Ah, but remember, just like old President W, who didn’t like nuance, these sage scientific pundits ignore the much more complex, much more interesting analysis. And it proves that, just like all the other anti-sconce fantasies of the denialists, this canard is empty. Here is the latest inconvenient Antarctic melting truth. And what is more, there is the problem of that warming ocean, or rather oceans. Oops.

So while we are justifiably watching the melting Arctic, and astonished at its immediate disruptive effects on northern hemisphere weather patterns, the sleeping giant to the south is readying a big surprise for us. Arctic ice is already afloat; its melting has little effect on global sea levels. Greenland on the other hand is another story for another time. But Antarctica’s continental ice sheet is the largest storehouse of frozen water on the planet. Remember Hurricane Sandy? Just imagine how much more waterborne fun is in store for us with a 200-foot sea rise. That possibility is dismissed in this piece, but our recent experience argues for caution. The kind of caution that should encourage us to support President Obama’s foray – at long last – into the climate policy debate. And this caution must lead to action to curb greenhouse gases. Two great places to start are the Climate Reality Project and Bill McKibben’s 350.org.

Here is a great Bill Nye video explaining the scientific basics for those whose heads are not under the ground or in other dark places. Have a blast.

 

Supreme Corporatists

It’s been a long time since the Supreme Court has been so much in the news. Recent rulings on marriage equality and voting rights seem to cut in opposite directions, as this David Gans opinion piece asserts. But I see a broader agenda here, and I have a theory to explain it. My theory is this – though some decisions may complicate the picture – see the DOMA verdict – the right-wing majority will coalesce and hold firm whenever big corporate power is at stake. That is obvious in the infamous Citizens United decision, which allowed vastly expanded political spending by corporations. It is also clear, though a little less obvious to the contrary in Chief Justice Roberts leading a progressive(!) majority upholding the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Why? The conservative chief justice could step out on this legacy-defining issue because no major corporate ox awaited goring. Though health insurance exchanges are anathema to the most extreme right-wingers, the health insurance industry not only escapes this change unscathed – it picks up massive numbers of new customers and therefore heaps of profits for the vaults and the CEO salaries.

The Court’s decision to gut the Voting Rights Act is justly seen in racial terms – it’s mainly the states with a sordid past of racial discrimination which will feel the “liberating” effects. And in fact they are wasting no time. But see how this decision passed the corporatism test. Even with the Voting Rights Act in place, states with GOP-dominated legislatures and statehouses have been pushing the phantasmagorical specter of voter fraud and its remedy – voter ID laws. Guess what more voter ID laws will mean in addition of course to racial discrimination – more Republican victories. And who could argue that the GOP is anything but the promoter and defender of big corporate power.

The biggest test yet is just around the corner. Just wait until the decision on this case arrives.

 

Pollinator Patrol

I wanted to be wrong back around 1980 when I feared a sweeping change toward virtual corporate rule in this land that we love. I again wanted to be wrong around 1990 when I began educating myself on the looming monster of climate change. I feared this slow-moving crisis would be ignored, at our peril.  Well, we know how both of those turned out.  Here is what I want to be wrong about today. I ask you – visit natural areas, observe your garden if you are lucky and wise enough to have native plants on the premises. See any wild bees? How about butterflies?

Yes, spring was late here in Minnesota this year, mainly due to a climate change phenomenon known as Arctic amplification. But our gardens are largely in bloom, and I have yet to see a single large butterfly. Bees are also almost entirely absent. The neonicotinoid pesticides are the likely culprit in catastrophic bee decline, as I have written about recently, but our corporate-addled government is unconvinced. Now there is news that our “miracle” pesticides may be having a reach even beyond bees.

Here is another theory of mine. Dig into any environmental crisis, however “natural” it may seem, and you will find some example of “manmade progress,” well-meaning or otherwise, at its root. I will leave you to decide whether this example was well-meaning or not. So, we have one more everlasting gift to thank the “pro-bidness” W administration for. Thanks, Mr. Decider, and Happy Birthday!

 

Lonely at the Top; Sneaky Too

No big news here. Worker pay about stable, CEO pay through the roof. And – all you “future millionaires” out there – get used to a few things. First, your upwardly mobile future would have been more secure if you had been born in Britain rather than our American “land of opportunity.” And if you are still working on the first part of that first million, maybe you are just too damned nice.

In the interest of truly being “fair and balanced,” let’s be clear. You don’t have a be a greed-drunk bully if you are rich. I love this story by Gar Alperovitz (author of a book that just hit my reading list). Positively inspiring.

 

“Oh Beautiful for smoggy skies, insecticided grain,

For strip-mined mountain’s majesty above the asphalt plain.

America, America, man sheds his waste on thee,

And hides the pines with billboard signs, from sea to oily sea.”

― George Carlin

 

Contributed links to this posting – Bonnie Blodgett, Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 1/13/13

13 01 2013

The Land of Make Believe  //

It’s a country where you’d better profess a strong religious belief if you hope to gain high office. It’s a country where nearly half of the public believes in a magical explanation of Earth’s and humanity’s origin. And it is the country where “doubt” around the critical issue of climate change, as reported by the overwhelming majority of scientists, just won’t go away.

It’s modern America, where that special brand of magical thinking, i.e., belief in the literal truth of religious stories, inexplicably endures. Not that several prominent authors haven’t tried to explain. Both Chris Mooney and Susan Jacoby have decried the harm that arises from our willful denial of inconvenient science. And Jacoby has a new book that looks promising. In The Great Agnostic, Jacoby tells the story of Robert Ingersoll – a Gilded Age freethinker who struggled to help America become more secular. Based on my reading of her excellent Age of American Unreason, I am putting the new book on my reading list.  Here is an interview with the author that ran on NPR.

Why is the work of authors like Jacoby important? Our national politics suffers from hypocrisy and exclusion – however brilliant a potential leader might be, if he or she has theological views too far from the conventional Christian mainstream, there is virtually no chance for election to major national office. And how a country whose economic dominance has been so defined by technological advance can allow itself to slip into such willful ignorance of scientific reality seems a mystery – until you realize that a public who believes unscientific baloney is much easier to marginalize and immobilize.

My son is an officer in an organization promoting secular society – the Secular Student Alliance.

Normalizing Climate Change in the Upper Midwest

When I moved to the Twin Cities, the annual “bottom-out” temperature range, as it happens, for this week in January, was high 20, low 2. But if you look in today’s Star Tribune, you will see a different story – 23 and 7. So what gives? Our friends at the paper are comparing today’s temps to a shorter range – when the temps had already warmed, thanks to sunspots or an Inhofian hoax or something like that. Of course, even with these ginned up numbers, what has happened over the last few days (yet another disgusting January rainstorm, culminating in a mess of snow remnants refrozen into crusty, treacherous ice) here in the Twin Cities would have been weird 25 years ago. Today, well, it’s just normalized weirdness of our local variety. Paul Douglas gives the context.

Why it is Called GLOBAL Climate Change

Though I have been following climate change since the late 1980s, I cannot recall a time when there has been such a confluence of aberrant weather occurring simultaneously around the world. Quite a roundup. Rampant bush fires and a heat wave so intense and persistent in Australia that they have had to concoct new colors for the weather map. Tornadoes in Italy, icy cold in the Middle East, drought across America. Extreme weather in the US, as reported in the Guardian.

Do you think all this mayhem could have something to do with the melting Arctic?  I am currently reading Mark Lynas’ Six Degrees. Although the book is five years old, I am learning a lot from it. The structure is intriguing: each chapter explains what researchers say we can expect for each Centigrade degree that we warm our home planet. What I am finding most interesting is this – predictions based on the existing science of 2008. In the chapter I am reading right now, Three Degrees, Lynas writes:

“One likely outcome of is that a reduction in Arctic sea ice will exacerbate the drying of western North America. Instead of ocean heat remaining trapped under surface ice during the winter, once most of the ice cap has disappeared, large areas of open ocean will remain exposed toe the winds, altering the usual pattern of winter weather over North America. In one modeling study, the rain-bearing systems get shunted farther north toward Canada and southern Alaska, and away from the drought-scarred plains of the United States.”

Eerie how that prediction is playing out. The most interesting thing of course is how much faster all these consequences are playing out, compared to the forecasts. And remember that all the extreme weather we are seeing are taking place on a planet that has warmed “only” just under one degree. The Onion has a nice satirical take. And here is a down-to-earth forecast of what is in store in the near future – this year.

Seems to me that, when a house is on fire, you don’t argue about what is causing the fire, and how bad it has to get before you take action. You get the damned fire extinguisher, start spraying and call for help. Isn’t it about time for a carbon tax? Thomas Friedman thinks so. (You have to read to the end.) So does a true hero of the people, Senator Bernie Sanders. And for depth on the political climate and inspiration for action, this NPR story featuring scientists Michael Mann and Katharine Hayhoe is very useful.

Pork Bung: It’s What’s for Dinner

Here is a guarantee. If you listen to this excellent This American Life story (audio available 7:00 PM EST 1/13/13), you will think twice before ordering that “seafood” appetizer at your local chain bistro. This story gives new meaning to that old pork industry adage – “we use the entire pig, everything but the squeal.” My take – just one more reason for avoiding factory-farm meat.

In the Name of Common Sense

The horrific Newtown school massacre focused public attention on gun violence. A new momentum has grown, and we can only hope that it builds toward common-sense measures to stem the tide of violence. And of course it continues, daily, in our country. This Slate site keeps track of the body count.  Vice President Joe Biden has been talking to groups with various perspectives this past week, and he now has an agenda. Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and her husband Mark Kelly are speaking out, and have formed an action group. Jon Stewart’s take on the issue is funny, but packs a punch. Look for a cameo by Mike Huckabee, one of my favorite pignorant pundits.

Wolf Hunt Controversy Continues

Minnesota’s wolf hunt is over – for this year. But this hunt –which can only be described as a hunt for sport or fun – will continue to be a hot topic and something that groups will continue to fight. This group is worthy of support.

Jobs Drive the Economy

This interview with Paul Krugman is worth your time. Appearing on Moyers and Company, the Nobel economist argues for rebuilding infrastructure, and compares our current economic situation with the 1930s.

Corporatocracy

Big business and oligarchs rule. George Carlin had it right. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

25 Cheers

Truthout’s Peter Dreier says progressives have many reasons to celebrate. Count ‘em.

“Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

― Martin Luther King Jr.

Contributed links to this posting – Christy Bailly, Jeff Carlson, Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 12/9/12

9 12 2012

Mother Nature Demands Respect //

If the planet could talk to us, it might evoke Rodney Dangerfield: “I tell ya, I don’t get no respect.” But maybe the natural world is talking to us. And some of the most recent messages seem uncannily timed. We best pay attention.

Next to the “fiscal cliff” drama, the second biggest topic in recent weeks here in America has been Hurricane Sandy’s devastation – which hit the most crowded part of the US just before Election Day. But as I write this, Typhoon Bopha – after killing at least 500 in the Philippines – has made a u-turn and is threatening the island nation with an encore. This out-of-season storm – like Sandy one that most experts link to human-caused climate change – provides a dramatic backdrop to the current, latest installment of world climate talks, in Doha, Qatar. Not that it will goad wealthy nations – particularly the United States – into taking action commensurate with the threat. Proof of non-commitment arrived Saturday.

So while delegates – doing the bidding of their national leaders – continue to pay lip service rather than take meaningful action, they have to work harder all the time to ignore dramatic new information that seems to arrive daily. This Scientific American article paints a dire picture of current trends leading to the high end of temperature-rise predictions. For a “report card” on the Arctic, check this Huffington Post piece, which also includes a series of before-and-after photos of scenes around the world already affected by climate change. And here is an NBC News piece detailing the dramatic increase in polar melting. Even the World Bank is getting into the act. Listen to the president of the Bank, Jim Yong Kim, who does an effective job explaining the devastation we are insuring if we fail to act. As he rightly points out, “once-in-a-lifetime events are happening all the time.”

So what needs to happen? Here are a few ideas. First, I was glad to see the Green Party’s Jill Stein use an image I used recently – the “environmental cliff.” Here, former Vice President Al Gore chides President Obama for lack of action on this important issue. And for an idea on what is really needed, try this piece on the notion of “zero carbon.” In her comments, Jill Stein recommended what I think is the best measure of all for getting the entire energy and climate picture turned in a positive direction – a carbon tax. NASA’s James Hansen calls it “fee and dividend.” By any name, it will make a big difference – if only we can summon political will.

Cheap Gas Costs Too Much

In our recent election, the issue of the price of gasoline surfaced from time to time, as if the president could control it. The debate of course was about how to keep the price low. But the low price means its true cost – the environmental damage caused by burning all fossil fuels – is left out of the equation. Currently, a variety of factors are holding the price stable at a reasonably low level. I have personal evidence that it is too low. Just the other day, I parked my car in the grocery store lot near a minivan that was empty, locked and running. Why? I could only surmise that the owners wanted immediate comfort from the cool dampness when they returned with their groceries. When I left, there it was, still running, still spewing. I have seen this even more frequently during hot summer days. If gas cost more, do you think these comfort freaks would still waste and pollute? Maybe. But here is another reason to raise the price of gas. The taxes are used to fund transportation infrastructure. And I think here in Minnesota, Governor Dayton’s administration has the right idea. Not that the “garage logic” guy will agree on that one!

Two Hard Lessons

I need to be reminded periodically just what a special, progressive place I call home. Not that the experience has to be pleasant. First there was a Bill McKibben event – the Twin Cities stop on his “Do the Math” tour.  I tried to buy a ticket a few days after the stop was announced. Out of luck – fastest sellout in the country. And then there was the Friday night Twin Cities debut of the new documentary “Chasing Ice.” I was eager for this show – National Geographic photographer James Balog, the subject of the movie, was scheduled to do a question and answer session after the early show. I rode the bus and train over to Uptown, approached the counter, plunked down my cash. But wait – out of luck. The show had sold out in three days. The late show, sans discussion, was three hours later, and my border collie was alone at home. (I had already been gone several hours before the show.) So I am left to try to find another time to head to the theater. Next time, I move fast! And of course I recommend both McKibben and Balog to you.

The Whole Dirty Story

A friend pointed me to a clever cartoon video that explains the greed-driven financial morass that confronts today’s America. The narrator is Lou Grant, er, uh, Ed Asner. Here – watch the video. See if you can catch the single offensive, graphic metaphor. (Hint – it involves tinkle-down economics.) Fox News, always on the lookout for something to foam at the mouth about, had a blast of faux outrage with this one. See the Young Turks for that story. But the sideshow does not lessen the impact – or the entertainment value – of this clever little piece that tells it like it is.

Our Broken System – and Fix-it Ideas

I find it especially gratifying when conservatives point out just how extreme their brethren have become over the last 30 years – and the corrosive effect their greed-based, scorched-earth politics has had on the entire country. Here is the latest example to come to my attention. Bill Moyers interviewed former Oklahoma Representative Mickey Edwards. He is the author of The Parties Versus the People. And though Edwards is a little too think with the false equivalence for my taste – repeatedly alleging corresponding extremism on the Democratic side – he does make a powerful case for getting the corporate money out of politics. I agree – that is the root cause of so much that is wrong in America today – including John Boehner and Mitch McConnell risking going over the metaphorical fiscal cliff in the name of protecting low marginal tax rates on the very wealthy. And let’s not forget the unelected godfather of greed, Grover Norquist – who has recently run into some headwinds, at long last. Get the corporate money out, and watch all manner of good things happen. The Move to Amend folks know all about that.

Fighting Dirty Energy, Dirty Weather, Filthy Future

Young people own what is to come, for better or worse. More are speaking out and taking action – which is something that gives this old boomer a modicum of hope. Read about young college students taking action against fossil fuel polluters – via university endowment funds. And here is another angle taking shape – the undeniably discriminatory nature of coal’s negative side effects.

Bon (Bug) Appétit

Eating lower on the food chain is one way to reduce your carbon footprint. I have been eating far less meat in recent years, with associated health benefits for me and the planet alike. But for many Americans, insect cuisine may be going a bit far. Want flies with that?

Global Light Show

A new NASA video is making the rounds. It is undeniably beautiful. Take a look here. The majestic background music and enthusiastic narration tell us this is a good thing. But I need to spoil the fun. Besides beauty, I see two things here. The overwhelming share of that light is – you guessed it – burning fossil fuel. If ever there was a win-win, it would be curbing fossil-fueled light pollution. Here is one organization working to do just that.

“Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people
Living life in peace” – John Lennon

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN

Contributed links to this posting – Tess Galati, Allyson Harper, David Oertel





IBI Watch 11/25/12

25 11 2012

 

Pick Your Metaphor  /

What’s your preference? Nero fiddling amid fire? Rearranging the Titanic’s deck chairs? Maybe it is David Suzuki’s image of a giant car heading towards a brick wall and everyone arguing over where they’re going to sit. Comparing the massively accumulating climate crisis evidence with the general level of knowledge, let alone commitment, any one of those metaphors could fit.

For some time, projections of warming have offered a range of possibilities, sort of like those hurricane path forecast cones.  According to newly updated predictions, the upper end of the projections looks more and more likely. If that one is not extreme enough for you, here is an even gloomier prospect – 7 degrees C. by 2060. Now consider – all the chaotic changes in Arctic ice that melts, hurricanes that develop late in the season, supercharge and then and turn in unexpected directions, monsoons that fail and droughts that won’t quit – have needed only one degree increase for startup. This piece from the Boomer Warrior site has it about right – we are entering the “non-linearity zone.” So what are we doing about it? Incredibly, planning to build many, many more coal plants. And as for conversation about fixes, this short animation about tells it all.

 

For those of us who have been following this issue for a long time – in my case back to the late 80s – the lack of alarm and political will is by turns disappointing and shocking. Of course, powerful interests have bent public opinion to their do-nothing will.  But even some who should (and possibly do) know better continue to pooh-pooh the forecasts, and ridicule activists as chicken littles.  Just read this recent treatise by Bjorn Lomborg, who at least has a scientific credential and certainly can’t be consigned to the ignominious club of the Inhofes, Tillersons and Limbaughs. But his sin, in my book, is to argue that because reducing carbon emissions has thus far been pretty much a futile endeavor. The only chance we have of averting catastrophe over the next several decades is ‘all of the above.’ In other words, invest in clean energy, protect and harden infrastructure, and figure out a way to reduce those carbon emissions.

What is needed is commitment on the part of citizens and government to do all those right things.  Meanwhile, we are making it harder on ourselves. Look at this Heidi Cullen article from a few months back, detailing problems with the satellite system essential to gathering timely and accurate weather data. But there is evidence that industry is “getting it,” as this piece on insurance shows. And listen to this NPR story on what climate change is doing to cranberry producers. If you listen carefully, you will hear one of the farmers laugh off the idea of human-made climate change, even as he is clearly dealing with consequences himself. A ditto head, maybe?

Virtually all experts agree that the only hope we have of halting the greenhouse forces we have unleashed is drastically reducing our carbon emissions.  The best idea I have seen for achieving that goal is taxing carbon through what NASA meteorologist James Hansen calls “fee and dividend.” Sign a petition at the Climate Lobby website. You will be glad you did.

If you want to learn lots more about the issue and the best ideas for mitigating the damage already done, and getting us on a sustainable path, here is one tremendous resource.  It’s the archive for last week’s “24 Hours of Reality” event presented by the Climate Reality Project. Scroll down and you can pick an hour covering a region you would like to investigate.  For a light touch, try the new Symphony of Science entry or the Science Girl – a science project the likes of which we need to see more!

 

Needed: An End to Chemical War

Forget anthrax, mustard gas and phosgene. Think pesticides and oil-based fertilizers. The agricultural revolution over the past seven decades – led by Norman Borlaug – dramatically ramped up grain harvests, but at a great cost. It has led to today’s factory farms and monocultures of corn and soybeans, which deplete soil and require application of massive quantities of toxic, oil-based chemicals to keep the production coming. Monsanto is making a killing in so many ways.

Here are just a few looks at today’s agriculture situation. First, a look at the war between insect pests and chemical insecticides. Next, you no doubt have heard about “colony collapse disorder,” which has been plaguing beekeepers across the country.  Natural phenomenon? Don’t bet your lunch on it. Then there is the absolute madness of growing corn for biofuel.

The factory farm boosters say this is the way it has to be.  Larger is cheaper, more efficient, inevitable. A growing chorus of dissenters says there is another way. Prominent among that crowd is activist Bill McKibben. I recently finished his excellent book Eaarth, which I strongly recommend. One factoid from the book – in 1940, we extracted 2.3 calories of food energy from a single calorie of fossil fuel energy. In 2008, that morphed into 10 calories of fossil fuel energy for a single calorie of food energy.

We vote with our purchases. Those “low, low prices” from the factory food industry have their own costs. Here are a few sources for smarter alternatives. Find and join a CSA (community-supported agriculture) farm, as I did many years ago. Or grow your own.

 

Shoot, Trap, Hang from a Tree . . .

Many things make me proud to be a Minnesotan by choice.  Our recent rejection of two constitutional amendments in the face of well-funded propaganda is a good example. The ongoing wolf hunt is NOT. I am not alone in that sentiment. I can’t escape the conclusion that hunters and trappers are slaughtering these canines mainly for fun, for the trophy value.  Oh, and as some hunters have explained in the media – they are killing too many deer.  Hmm. Hunting for deer is one thing – people eat the venison.  But hunting the wild cousins of our best friends for the “sport” of it?  And worse yet, using cruel traps to bag your catch?  Barbaric.

Here are a few recent opinion pieces that I like. First, a thoughtful essay by Cheryll Ostrom.  Next, Paul John Scott gets to the heart of the matter. And finally, Howard Goldman declares the truth about the hunt – it is all for “fun” and betrays a compromise.

The hunt has caused my wife and me to cancel our paid membership in the International Wolf Center.  Incredibly, the center is not opposing the hunt, instead officially congratulating themselves that a hunt is “possible” because of expanded numbers and range.  To be fair, I am sure that many staffers there are just as opposed to the hunt as I am. We are switching our support to this organization.

 

A Nation of Many Nations

Looking at the rise of fundamentalist Christianity as a right-wing political force over the past 30 years, plus the prevalence of blatantly anti-scientific views, I have often wondered whether the South was actually the victor in the Civil War.  At other times, I have wished those so inclined would just go and have their own country, ruled by a sort of Bible-thumping sharia. This is why two recent articles caught my eye and in one case, got me laughing out loud.

First – what I saw as original analysis, going well beyond the accepted red/blue divide. Colin Woodard’s piece 11 Nations, Divisible sheds much light on regional differences, voting patterns and long history.

And then – you want divisible?  We have divisible for you. Commentator and author Paul VanDevelder throws down the gauntlet to the passel of red states that have recently threatened secession.  Sounds like a pretty good deal to me. Hilarious to boot.

 

The Twinkie Offense

It’s a question on the minds of so many today. Who killed the Twinkie? Was it greedy bosses? Was it recalcitrant unions? Who better to opine on such a weighty topic than Nobel-winning economist Paul Krugman?  Here is a quote: “the success of the postwar American economy demonstrates that, contrary to today’s conservative orthodoxy, you can have prosperity without demeaning workers and coddling the rich. Along the way, however, we’ve forgotten something important — namely, that economic justice and economic growth aren’t incompatible. America in the 1950s made the rich pay their fair share; it gave workers the power to bargain for decent wages and benefits; yet contrary to right-wing propaganda then and now, it prospered. And we can do that again.”

 

None of the Above

While we are on the topic of fundamentalist religion, here is a trend for you.  Turns out that the setbacks for fundies in the recent election may be just the beginning.  We can only hope.

 

Terrified Creatures: Who Could Blame Them?

About 1.5 acres of Amazon rainforest are cut down every second.  No wonder these new discoveries – as reported by the Onion – are cowering in mortal fear.

 

Holiday Shopping, Anyone?

There is no better time of year to check in on Reverend Billy and his Church of Stop Shopping. And my favorite holiday song is nearly out of season.  Watch its author perform before its shelf life runs out.

 

“Some day the earth will weep, she will beg for her life, she will cry with tears of blood. You will make a choice, if you will help her or let her die, and when she dies, you will die too.” – John Hollow Horn, Oglala Lakota

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN

 

Contributed links to this posting – Jeff Carlson, Allyson Harper