IBI Watch 12/22/13

22 12 2013

The True Universal Language  //

A friend mentioned Esperanto the other day. Now that is something I had not thought of for a long time – the well-intentioned but largely futile effort to create an artificial but logical, easily learned tongue that aspired to be everyone’s second language.  Esperanto has not caught on widely, and that is a shame. But no matter. Another language is universally recognized, and it really gets results. . . or could anyway. Let’s look at a couple of examples.

First – what to make of the mass release of political prisoners in Russia this week? President Vladimir Putin (aka Vlad the En-Jailer) summarily liberated a virtual crowd of captives – ex-oligarch and rival Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the protesting punk group Pussy Riot, and the Greenpeace 30 protesters. So what’s going on? Is Putin finally morphing into the “good man” into whose soul our insightful ex-president George W peered? The easy answer is that Russia wants a cleaner image for the upcoming Sochi Winter Olympics. But it is really the universal language at work. Positive image, more happy, well-heeled visitors, more money filling the Olympic coffers. Isn’t it nice when that universal language – cash – can deliver desired results? Think about it – all the various reasons Russia held this diverse crowd melted away when lucre loomed. Russia has another Olympic controversy to tame – its stern and hostile approach to gays – but that is another story for another time.

Second – North Dakota is experiencing an orgy of oil revenue. New, unconventional drilling techniques including horizontal exploration and of course fracking have unleashed a gusher of huge proportions. Investments are leading to piles of fast cash. In other words, money in but lots more money out. But the benefits bring challenges, some of them detailed in that MSN piece, some not. For instance, we have to ask if we have learned a damned thing from previous boom and bust cycles, especially when it comes to the environment. Just read this NY Times piece by Clifford Krauss, on efforts to manage the inevitable byproduct of all this oil exploitation – “waste” natural gas. Perusing those statistics about how much good could come from using that byproduct to heat homes and businesses provides the answer – not a damned thing. The rush for the quick money means grab the oil, fast, and do not be deliberate about capturing the gas byproduct. Let it burn aimlessly, producing harmful greenhouse gas emissions – just the cost of progress I guess.

Yes, I know it is a bit of a stretch to talk about money as a universal language. But I ask this – if money has the power to make Strongman Putin go all soft on his most prominent political prisoners, what power could it have, with sensible laws and regulations, to build the common good and save our sorry collective keister? What if it were not free to simply vent or flare “byproduct” gas?  What if every bit of carbon produced in oil and coal exploitation were assessed a fee, and the revenue used to create sustainability?  Would we be wantonly adding to the burden that we put on the already taxed atmosphere every day (90 million tons of carbon dioxide daily, but who is counting?) if producers were paying that fee for all the carbon? Of course not. We would be building the needed infrastructure in a hurry, in order to keep the oil and the oil cash flowing until renewables completely took over. Now that would be using money to produce results that benefit all.

There is a way to get those big benefits from the universal language of cash – make carbon pay its way. That’s just what Citizens Climate Lobby dedicates itself to. Read more about the carbon fee and dividend. And it is not just the carbon fee. How about saving waste heat? We need these ideas and so many more, before it is too late.

 

Too Late Already?

A growing chorus of scientists add up all the evidence and have a single grave conclusion – the human race is toast. This excellent AlterNet story by Dahr Jamail tells the story in articulate detail.  They may be right, but we really have not begun to fight. It is always a good time to cut through the pignorance (pretend ignorance) and get to purposeful work. And fortunately, many are trying – and there is progress to report.

Want proof that people can “get it” about clean transportation? Here – winter cycling is growing in, of all places, the coldest major metro area in the whole US – my adopted home region. And it regularly dips below zero here, folks. Want solar? We’ve got solar. In the hot desert? No, Iowa. Then there is the big picture – 2013 energy breakthroughs that are other than newfangled ways to get at more and more of the destructive old coal and oil. And what of powering the entire world with solar? How much land would that require? Less than you might think.

Remember Nelson Mandela’s words – “It always seems impossible until it’s done.”

 

Incarceration Nation

I saw this Foreign Policy article, really a thought experiment, in my local newspaper this week. It imagines the outsized percentage of the US population, and the obscene portion of its minority population, as a distinct nation. The online version, of course, has the benefit of many links. This really got me thinking. And then Bill Moyers came along with his interview of lawyer/activist Michelle Alexander on the same topic. Here are facts and figures from the show, and here is the entire interview. Considering the cost, considering the unfairness, considering the wasted lives, you have to ask – Why?

 

Antibacterials Banned; Next up Phantom Plastic

One of the stupidest, but most enticing consumer ideas in modern America has to be the notion that we can make everything so damned squeaky clean that we never pick up any nasty bugs. That’s the idea behind antibacterial soap and its most ubiquitous ingredient, triclosan. That “miracle” substance, linked to health problems and more indirectly to mutant pathogens, will at long last face a sunset, barring lobbying by corporatists and other anti-science stooges. The only question is – what took so long?

So there is the good news. Now look at another issue. We can only hope we wise up faster on this one – minuscule plastic waste from personal care products that is fouling the Great Lakes. If it is all about the humans, then by all means we need do nothing. If we give a damn, then we need to read and act on the story’s punchline – “stop putting it out there.” Should be an easy choice. Learn more. Be sure to scroll down to the imbedded video. And then visit 5Gyres, an excellent site – new to me – dedicated to banning plastic pollution. You might even find a petition or three there, or something more useful – a chance to contribute.

 

Ambassador for Fairness

Billie Jean King is going to Russia with the American delegation to the Olympics. Her tennis glory is long past, but if you wonder about her message, see the note above in the comments about Putin’s Russia. I enjoyed this Scott Simon essay, and I think you will. Recently, I was so impressed with the tennis great’s intelligence, insights and magnanimity to her critics. Those were on display when she was interviewed by Terry Gross on Fresh Air.

 

Altering Earth’s Life Support System – Guest Post by Rolly Montpellier

This week’s guest post offers a concise summary of the state of climate change as reported by IPCC scientists, and discusses an important concept – the world carbon budget. Be sure to check out the excellent imbedded video from the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Toronto’s Rolly Montpellier blogs at the Boomer Warrior site. That site sometimes features my work as well.

 

Threatened Polar Bears – Two Views

It is no secret that the polar bear’s natural world is melting, and the cause is nothing like natural. Here is a story on one result – interspecies mating with grizzlies, to the detriment of both. And here is an iconic, award-winning picture from National Geographic.

 

Climate Change All Over this Land

A friend shared with me this very rich site with abundant maps, links and graphs. From those crazy doomsaying radicals at the US Geological Service.

 

The Year in Extreme Weather Pictures

2013 has been quite a year. Just wait until next.

 

2000-Plus Years of Christmas

If you stay away from the “war” hogwash, you can learn some really interesting things.

 

Holy Sheep

Somehow I can’t resist featuring these guys every holiday season. Don’t know if it is the lights, the tongue-in-cheek delivery or the fact that one of my two dogs is a clever, obsessed, deranged, rescued border collie.

 

A World Worth Imagining and Building

And in pictures. Thank you, John Lennon, and thank you, Pablo Stanley!

 

Happy Christmas, and likewise for all other holidays you may celebrate!

 

“The ultimate test of man’s conscience may be his willingness to sacrifice something today for future generations whose words of thanks will not be heard.” – Gaylord Nelson

 

Contributed links or content to this posting – Bobbie Chong, Allyson Harper, Rolly Montpellier, Tammie Stadt, David Vessel

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN

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IBI Watch 11/3/13

3 11 2013

The Utility of Futility //

Call it a war among friends. This is an argument about climate change that is getting louder in recent days. It’s not the dreary battle between those who respect climate science and those who deny, facts be damned. No, this one is about whether it’s already too late to slow and ultimately reverse the manmade climate change juggernaut. And while this may seem like inside baseball – the debate rages in particular in chat groups among highly engaged activists – it has consequences for all of us and for the planet.

Evidence mounts daily for the futile position. For a few of the latest examples, consider this article about projections that we will burn through the world’s “carbon budget” in just 20 years. (The carbon budget is the estimated limit to total fossil fuel use before triggering climate change feedbacks that push world temperatures beyond the “safe” 2o C. rise that most experts say is already pretty much a done deal.)  Or maybe a look at the level of Arctic warming tells the story better. Then there are new IPCC projections of climate change cutting into food supplies, while the human population continues to expand. Then there is the debt we owe to the ocean, which has been absorbing the largest part of our emissions, and turning acid as a result. That debt will be repaid with interest. (Check the imbedded NOAA video.)

In my mind the most important battle is still that between climate scientists and their supporters on the one hand and denialists on the other. Why? Because the denialist crowd (I refuse to call them “skeptics,” because that implies openness to persuasion) still has the upper hand when it comes to policy. In other words, that battle is far from won, particularly in the pivotal country known as the US of A.

But the battle within the climate science activist community is vital as well. Why? If a significant share of those who trust the science say it’s too late to save this place known as Earth, this is fuel for the very profitable fires of the fossil fuel oligarchs, particularly these guys. If anyone knows how to capitalize (i.e., build lots more capital) on policy inertia that is helped by public futility, it is the Koch Brothers (whom I like to call “oiligarchs.”).

Think of it this way. We are on a ship, moving at full speed. The ship seems to have sprung a leak. One crowd – the one that holds sway, at least in America – says “Don’t worry about it, we are still moving at speed, and anyway, when we reach our destination, there will be a miracle fix that will bail out all the water and fix the hull, the whole works. So just shut up now and enjoy the ride.” Another crowd acknowledges the leak, and some are fighting to persuade the captain to slow down the ship and dedicate all energy to plug that leak, which by the way is growing, slowly but steadily. But part of that latter, fact-aware, crowd does complex calculations to prove that the leak is growing too quickly, there is already too much water on board, and of course that distant port is too far off for that magical fix. The result – full steam ahead, pay no attention to that hull problem, if it even exists.

I say, let’s pull together and fix the damned leak. Right about now.

Prescription: Scientific Revolt

One of the things I keep promising myself I will do on this blog site is post a list of my most recommended books. A pillar of that collection will be Naomi Klein’s The Shock Doctrine. Klein brilliantly documents how powerful industrialists have continued to profit from crises, and, insidiously, foment crisis where one does not already exists – in order to privatize profits and socialize losses. Klein has weighed in several times on the climate crisis, so when she spoke out recently on climate science and activism, it was worth noting.

Here is Klein’s complete article, in which she rightly calls out the godfather of scientific activism, James Hansen. She also notes the work of Kevin Anderson and Alice Bows, both of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research.

Commuting Lessons from Orangutans?

Most stories these days about these amazing, endangered apes from Indonesia and its surroundings are on the sad and futile side – like this and this. That may be why I found this NPR story oddly entertaining and inspiring. The author, Richard Harris, used it as a chance to speculate on the possibilities of leaner, meaner modes of commuting.

While we are on the subject of commuting, the New York Times recently ran a Jane Body piece on something I have believed for many years. That is, commuting by car – something I avoid in every possible way – puts a big hit on human health in so many ways. Chris Tackett at the TreeHugger site wrote a commentary, with an imbedded link to the Brody piece. My favorite mode of commuting is the humble bicycle. I understand that many are not physically fit enough to share my passion. That is why inventions like this could be a big boost to two-wheeled culture.

Facts, Please

Stories like the one I link to here darkly amuse me. Why? Because it focuses on Antarctica, the “cleanup hitter” in the lineup of manmade climate change effects waiting to mow us down. The author looks into ancient climate conditions, which of course is valuable. But what about the documented changes in climate patterns? They include drier, colder temperatures in parts of Antarctica, plus heavier snow in other parts (which some denialists use as evidence debunking manmade climate change). This story about Antarctic glaciers melting from below, due to warmer ocean currents, is far more relevant.  Likewise this one from Bloomberg – based on updated IPCC projections.

Star Tribune commentator Bonnie Blodgett had a similar concern with a widely read New York Times article. The “unmentionable” in this case was the underlying assumption that continued growth is the only way. Here are Blodgett’s column  and the NYT piece.

Food Critic, Bee Booster

Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl, well-known Twin Cities food writer, got the story on pollinator decline just about right in an appearance on Minnesota Public Radio this week. Her prognosis was a bit too bright, in my view. It strayed close to that deluded notion that if we just plant our gardens right, all will be well again. But she covered the issues well, except for one – corporate control of agriculture (and everything else!). Read more at my recent post, the cover story – Blame it on Mother.

This is Your Chicken on Drugs

Another public radio story this week clarifies just how tough it will be to solve a growing problem – overuse of antibiotics on farms. This piece focused on the veterinarian’s perspective. You may be shocked, shocked, I say, to learn that money again is at the heart of the problem. I also covered this story in more depth, just last week. See An Unplanned War on Drugs.

Equipped for the Long Term

Buried deep in the debate about human longevity – the infamous NTE (near-term extinction) concept I alluded to earlier are current trends. Absent a major wake-up call, coupled with concerted, collective public action, we really are on course to make it mighty damned difficult for our descendants and maybe any critter larger than beagle to hang around this orb. But destroy the planet? Not a chance. Not with these guys to mind the store’s ruins.

Green in the Extreme

I can relate to most of these, except maybe for number 4. I like to think this weekly blog makes me less obnoxious. OK, maybe that is another form of self-delusion.

 

Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them.”  ~Bill Vaughn

 

Contributed links to this posting – Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 10/20/13

20 10 2013

What Scotty Said //

If we live in a material world, governed by scientific laws, then surely something big must be happening – something changing in the system – as a consequence of the 90 million tons of carbon dioxide that we humans collectively pour daily into the atmosphere, 24/7/365. And, denialist assertions notwithstanding, the only thing really in doubt is how bad and how soon.

The recent IPCC finding – its fifth in a series – raised the probability that human activities are the cause of the already observed changes in atmosphere and ocean to at least 95%. That’s about as close to certain as it gets. The report is a formidable document, but this admirable 10-slide show constructed by Katherine Bagley and Zahra Hirji of Inside Climate News summarizes the key findings. Pay careful attention to the notion of a carbon budget. The IPCC clearly stated that, this being a material world, a vast but closed system, we have a choice – leave most of the world’s remaining carbon in the ground, or deal with the physical consequences. This is what activists Bill McKibben and James Hansen have been saying for years, but now this dire warning comes from a consensus-bound, conservative chorus of the world’s scientists.

The amount of carbon in the world is constant – what changes is its form and of course its effect on the climate system. For an accessible explanation, try this Mark Boslough piece on HuffPost.  And for a view of the scope of the pressure we are putting on this old planet, try to wrap your mind around this – we are adding the heat equivalent of four Hiroshima-size bombs to the atmosphere per second.

So we have some crucial choices – for instance, on Keystone XL. Are we smart enough to choose wisely? There is plenty of evidence for a dark view – as eloquently laid out in this recent Facebook post by Bodhi Paul Chefurka. Believers in the magic of technology assure us that techno-fixes – including geo-engineering – will save our bacon. (I like the subtitle for that piece – “7 far-out geoengineering ideas that could save the planet — or destroy it trying.”) In my book, there are potentially good geoengineering schemes – for instance, trying to engineer an artificial tree that sucks carbon out of the air – and awful schemes – basically anything that seeks to allow us to go ahead with business-as usual fossil fuel use. I put in that category all these space-based mirror schemes and especially trashing the upper atmosphere with soot.

The fact that such schemes are even being considered before we have done a fraction of what is possible by way of conservation and developing clean energy makes Bodhi Paul Chefurka’s case stronger. But the single best strategy, I believe, is making carbon pay its way. Using dramatically less of the stuff is the only hope we have going forward.

We really should have listened to the Enterprise’s engineer, more than four decades ago. That is, “ Ye cannae change the laws of physics.”

 

Theory and Practice

Whenever former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan appears in the media, I find it entertaining to hear him justify his not seeing the 2008 financial crisis coming. Now he is back – hawking his new book. To his credit, the longtime champion of deregulating the financial system now says he was wrong, and portrays himself as chastened when it comes to the theory of radical deregulation of markets. Listen to this NPR interview, in which the interviewer respectfully holds Greenspan’s feet to the fire. But you might say that the former Fed chief committed a big oversight during his years holding immense power – not listening to a wiser forecaster than he. The great Yogi Berra said, “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.”

 

Seas of Heartbreak

If people pay attention to climate science at all, they look to the land. That’s where burgeoning intense weather events like the recent Boulder CO flooding disaster, the out-of-season South Dakota blizzard and the new and destructive Australian fire season wreak their havoc on humans and their environs. Sure, rising sea levels have their effect, and will they ever have an effect in the decades to come (wanna buy some “land” in Miami, cheap?), but ocean morphing is something out of sight for most of us.

Here are three stories about what we are doing to the oceans – which after all cover 71 percent of the planet. The first is probably not directly related to the effect of our greenhouse gas emissions, the second caused in large part by them and the third the direct feedback.

First – cetaceans – whales, dolphins and porpoises – pop up in the news periodically, mostly because of beaching. Read about massive whale stranding in Madagascar. Tut, tut, the beasts will just have to get used to the racket we raise under the sea with our oil explorations and war games. And now there is growing concern that a mulititude of factors – including climate change – seem to be assailing dolphins. Dolphin in the ocean is the new canary in the coal mine?

Second – So creatures most people see as desirable are taking it on the chin. But there are always winners and losers, right? Right indeed – the lionfish are coming, and so are the jellyfish, in untold armadas. Come on in, folks, the water’s fine.

Third – The ocean apparently isn’t acid enough, so we are taking care of that, in a hurry. Carbon dioxide may be flirting with 400 parts per million in the atmosphere, but that is nothing compared to the way we have altered the pH of the ocean, a truly massive undertaking that goes on as we drive and burn fossil fuels. This is the change in the ocean that will have the gravest long-term effects on seaborne and land-based life. Those of us who gravitate toward environmental stories know how much more often of late we see phrases like “much graver than had been thought” or “deteriorating more rapidly than predicted.”

We on the land can help. The World Wildlife Fund, the Ocean Conservancy and Greenpeace all work to preserve the world’s oceans. However, this massive challenge comes back to that familiar one – how to drastically cut use of fossil fuels.

 

One Day, One Massive Boost to Your Climate Knowledge

The Climate Reality Project ( an organization I represent) will launch on October 22-23 this year’s 24 Hours of Reality – a content-packed event featuring speakers and media highlighting the costs of carbon pollution and pointing to solutions that can change the course of our future. You can tune in on the Internet, live or via archives, to six one-hour presentations, organized by regions of the world:

  • North America: how carbon pollution and climate change have had a severe impact on our ways of life and livelihoods.
  • South America and the Caribbean: water as our lifeblood, and the threats of rapidly melting glaciers, rising sea levels and ocean acidification.
  • Europe: infrastructure losses that have resulted from climate-related hazards and extreme weather, as well as how infrastructure is being forced to change in a changing world.
  • Africa: how climate change is contributing to growing food insecurity, along with socio-economic and political insecurity.
  • Asia: how extreme weather and other carbon pollution impacts are resulting in displacement of people within their countries.
  • Australia: how human health threats are exacerbated by climate change.

I hope you will tune in – the event is a great way to get up to date on latest research and learn the ways you can help solve the climate crisis.

 

Gimme that Old Time Coalition

That might be the motto for an idea hatched by Nobel economist and commentator Paul Krugman. Of course, the settlement that got US government working again is really another short-term fix. Krugman recalls a time when southern Democrats worked with Republicans to support conservative causes (think of the still-elusive goal of universal health care). But more important for our time, he sees a novel spin on that old alliance, a new direction that could mean real progress. Could.

 

Science for the Masses

Climate denialists and other enemies of science push their ideas in various ways. Two of the most common are these – disparage scientists and their findings as slanted or concocted or part of a conspiracy to secure more funding; assert that science journalists and activists are not actually scientists, and therefore lack standing to promote and defend scientific research results and projections. Fortunately, some scientists – most notably James Hansen – are recognizing the need for them to get out of the lab and into the spotlight to fight the well-funded denialists.

And there are the most valuable popularizers. Two were recently highlighted in the media. First – there is Elise Andrew, who aims her efforts at a young demographic, and operates a wonderful site with an in-your-face name. And speaking of young demographics, that’s exactly the target that Bill Nye aimed at two decades ago, when his tremendously entertaining PBS show hooked thousands of youngsters (including my son) and their parents. Nye has a new science series, Why with Nye. I really enjoyed an interview Weekend Edition Sunday did with him, and you will too.

 

“I’ve recognized there is no such thing as cheap gas. Whether you’re paying $3.51 in San Francisco or 9 cents a gallon in Caracas, someone, somewhere, is always paying more dearly for the stuff. Now when I buy gas I see hidden pennies everywhere – from the health effects of air pollution to the social cost of human rights violations in oil-producing countries to the money used by the U.S. military to police oil shipping lanes.” – Lisa Margonelli (excerpted from Oil on the Brain)

 

Contributed links to this posting –Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 9/29/13

29 09 2013

Too Late or Not Too Late?

The latest assessment from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) offers plenty of evidence for both arguments – that it is already past the time where we can solve our manmade climate crisis, or that we still have time to mitigate and reverse it. But some things are clear in all the projections – human activity is altering the climate, the trends are not favorable, and we are pushing the climate towards the point where it will be too late to do anything.

The new IPCC report – its fifth and first since 2007 – certainly offers some openings for denialists. It acknowledges the fact that our uncontrolled experiment in altering the climate with our greenhouse gases is not a linear process. It also fine-tunes some predictions from previous assessments, and in some cases suggests that prior predictions – at least for now through 2100 – may have been too steep. But for all but the most die-hard denialists (think of tobacco executives in the 1960s or maybe of Baghdad Bob as US forces invaded Iraq in 2003), the message is clearer than ever – we are steadily raising atmospheric carbon dioxide, which is warming the planet and altering the oceans and the entire planetary climate system.

Thanks to various media outlets, getting the gist of the latest from this conservative, consensus-bound body does not require poring through hundreds of footnoted pages. Here is an overview pdf. It runs more than 30 pages, but is actually quite easy to surf. Just look for the orange-shaded paragraphs. When you do, you will see that the report contains little good news. The vaunted (by denialists) “slowdown” or “pause” in warming noticed over the past 15 years? It’s a natural variation, and an indication that the heat is being absorbed by the deep oceans. (Want to know more about ocean heating? See here.)Not all the recent heat is ocean-bound, of course (only about 90 percent!), but all that heat will eventually warm the atmosphere. And even with the ocean’s shielding the atmosphere – for now – from the most serious heating, we still have the dramatic retreat of glaciers, ice sheets and the Arctic sea ice.

To learn more, try one or more of these:

A summary from the NPR blog

A report at the Economist’s blog site

A summary reported by Reuters

A fine summary posted by Joe Romm at the Climate Progress site

A set of graphics posted at Climate Central

There is always another choice – learn less, think magically, insert head into sand or other dark space. This Buzzfeed collection of familiar denialist assertions can help in that regard. It even has brief video samples attached for entertainment value. And of course you can read variants of those and others in the comment section following virtually all postings on climate change. In fact, another came to my attention recently – the one about human activity (the 90 million tons of CO2 we send skyward every day) being dwarfed by volcanoes. Here is a fact-based debunker of that canard. And all those comments bring up one of the challenges in moving policy on climate and energy in a sustainable direction. Public perception of science is found to be affected by all the rants of trolls and thinkers who know more than the world’s scientists. Though I am not particularly fond of Popular Science – they don’t cover my favorite issues anywhere near as often as Scientific American, Discover and National Geographic – I want to relay  a step that magazine felt necessary. That is, remove the comment platform for the anti-scientists, “skeptics” and denialists. It really has come to that. And reader comments are not the only source of anti-science propaganda. When it comes to media, we have to consider the source, particularly these oily headwaters.

There are people who are committed to climate science and climate policy, and then there is Kumi Naidoo. The executive director of Greenpeace – an organization I support – appeared on Moyers and Company this week. A veteran of daring protests that have led to grave physical danger and arrests, this is someone who puts his personal safety on the line in defense of a livable planet. I like his rhyming mantra – “Leave the coal in the hole, and the oil in the soil,” and also his call to action – “If we can mobilize trillions to bail out banks, bankers, bonuses, surely we can mobilize much less than that to deal with the climate crisis.” Naidoo’s take on the “too late/not too late” question is also right on. That is, it is too late for people already in the bull’s eye of sea rise and ice melt. We need to act and act forcefully to make sure it does not get too late for all humanity. That time is just about upon us.

A “Ted Talk” that Speaks Volumes

You may be able to find a complete recording of the recent “Ted-athon” on the Senate floor, but you will need to order several pizzas and a case of No-Doz to make it through. Instead, I prescribe Jon Stewart’s two-part sampling of this spectacularly off-tune solo hypocrisy. In part one, Stewart hits the “high” points of Senator Ted Cruz’s not-a filibuster. And in part two, he latches onto the senator’s cultural contribution, in which he uses the podium to read Dr. Seuss’ famous Green Eggs and Ham, allegedly to his daughter. Ten minutes of hilarious satire or 21 hours of glazed eyes and nausea. Choose wisely. And remember, this guy wants to be president.

I have a couple of points to make here. First, this display continues a not-so-proud Republican tradition of having a tin ear for culture. Remember Michele Bachmann and American Girl? How about Ronald Reagan and Born in the USA? And though it was not as public, my favorite story in this regard is President George W Bush’s alleged affinity for the songs of Creedence Clearwater Revival. The question is, did he understand or even listen to Fortunate Son? Yes, as Snopes points out, the song was not about President W but was there ever a more fortunate son? Second, the good Senator seems to have forgotten that Theodore Geisel (i.e. Dr. Seuss) was a staunch liberal. And most important of all, what is the point of that immortal kids’ book in the first place? Try it, you’ll like it. Uber-blogger Tom Degan makes that point in his imitable way right here.

There are two things I would like you to remember here, as we head, seemingly inexorably, toward yet another pigheaded government shutdown. First, Senator Ted Cruz, playing to the Tea Party extremists who increasingly control his party, is a health-care hypocrite of the first order. (That’s not saying he is alone in that regard.) And second, keep in mind that this tea-addled majority in the House, that is willing to risk shutting down the government, and not long after that, defaulting on the debts that the US government accrued on both Republican and Democratic watch, is a gerrymandered, phony majority. So get this – an extremist minority within a party that is actually a minority itself is acting completely contrary to the will of the American people. And this is a group that purportedly opposes tyranny. Folks, you just can’t make this up.

Nerds Can’t Dance

Or maybe they just shouldn’t. When I watched this video of Bill Nye the Science Guy dancing and ultimately tripping up, injured, on Dancing with the Stars, I was reminded of some movie scene. It was the hair – Tom Hulce, playing Mozart in one of my all-time favorite flicks, Amadeus. But I digress. The Science Guy’s knee injury looks painful but, thank goodness, not career threatening. Get right quick, Bill. We need you to do more stuff like this, this and this. And hey, break a leg. Or maybe not.

Food Rescued

It’s a downright scandal. Consider how much energy goes into creating our food, and then imagine this – 40 percent of food in America is wasted. News features recently have highlighted that shameful fact. Here is a fine example from the Los Angeles Times. The former president of Trader Joe’s has a better idea. It’s a combination store/restaurant that will offer food items that are just past those expiration dates, but still usable. Though Peter Sagal had a good old time with the idea on Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, here is hoping it sells.

Fix the Problem – Ten Ways

If asked to name the one problem to solve in order to create far-reaching, cascading positive change, I know what my answer would be. Get corporate hands off the levers of power. Their grip has been strengthening in recent years, thanks in no small part to the infamous Citizens United decision by the corporatocratic Supreme Court. Gar Alperovitz and Keane Bhatt have a wonderful, thought-provoking piece on Truthout. How many of these have you tried? It’s not too late . . . yet.

“I conceive that the land belongs to a vast family of which many are dead, few are living, and countless numbers are still unborn.” – A Chieftain from Nigeria

Contributed links to this posting – Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 9/22/13

22 09 2013

Preemptive Prefabrication //

The impending IPCC update on the climate crisis, due this week, has generated a lot of buzz, and a good deal of anti-science creativity as well. The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), a fundamentally conservative organization, will state more forcefully than ever that climate change – a documented rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide, causing – so far – nearly a one-degree C. temperature rise, accelerating ocean acidification and melting glaciers and ice sheets, plus many other joyful phenomena – is due to humans’ burning our addictive joy juice, i.e. fossil fuel. Here is a concise explanation from the Live Science site of the consensus-driven, cautious process followed by the IPCC.

The IPCC has a high profile – its leaders won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 – so it is not really surprising that the denialist forces are seizing the opportunity for some “first-strike” messaging. It’s not hard to find writers trumpeting a supposed lull in planetary change as proof that climate change is not real, not human-caused, and not something deserving concern. Here’s the strategy. Pick any combination of those three assertions, falsely present the scientific consensus on climate change as predictive of a linear, lock-step process, and presto, you further inoculate the public against pushing for sustainable energy and environment legislation. So goes policy paralysis. Here is a survey of denialist commentary from the likes of Fox News, the Junk Science site, and  Matt Ridley, writing in the Wall Street Journal. At that last link, you will find an oft-heard assertion from the denialist crowd, that far from being a cause of concern, climate change offers benefits. Shades of the Heartland Institute.

If you suspect a coordinated, full-court press here, you are not alone. So does Joe Romm, writing on his Climate Progress site. Pay careful attention to his graphics on carbon pollution and the seven planetary boundaries. He also cites a particularly egregious example of vacuous, tech-supreme, happy talk that I linked to just last week. (Scroll down to “The Magical Techno-Fix.”). And for some succinct analysis of this pre-emptive campaign, I like the Guardians’ climate commentators, John Abraham and Dana Nuccitelli. This duo has posted a new article reminding us of the stages of climate denial, all of which are on display to varying degrees in the latest round of denialist commentary.  For the record, here are the stages:

  • Deny the problem exists
  • Deny we are the cause
  • Deny the scientific consensus
  • Deny it’s a problem
  • Deny we can solve it
  • Sorry, it’s too late to solve

Here is an assignment steeped in futility, a sort of mission impossible (should you choose to accept it). Analyze the commentary linked above, and determine which articles represent which stages of denial. Then, strategize on how to change the minds of the commentators. Right, impossible.

This course is far wiser – concede that a completely melted, transformed planet will never be enough to convince these guys. That includes an ice-free summer Arctic, which is definitely on the way (current denialist trumpeting alleged ice “recovery” notwithstanding), with chaotic weather pattern consequences. Understand that denialism is not really about skepticism (which implies a willingness to see things differently) and give up the idea of every winning over the likes of Bjorn Lomborg, George Will and Lord Monckton (and our own well-funded, powerful deniers inside Congress). And support the following organizations, which are working hard to sway public opinion in the direction of sensible, sustainable energy and climate policy:

Boulder: the Arctic Connection

It is not possible to blame a particular destructive storm on manmade climate change. That includes hurricanes, even monsters like Katrina and Sandy. And it even includes the freakish storm complex that gouged Boulder, Colorado last week. That storm, called a “thousand-year flood,” dumped many months worth of rain in the space of a few days, killing at least four people and washing away houses, roads and bridges. Worse, it came on the heels of a persistent drought. For a look at just how outside the norm the event was, check this well-supported Time.com article from Bryan Walsh.

Since we have one planet, interconnected, it is wise to study how planetary forces influence weather patterns. The original research of Rutgers University scientist Jennifer Francis got new attention this week, on NPR’s Science Friday. Francis – whose work I have previously linked to (see “Wacky, Wobbly Weather”)– looks at documented changes in jet-stream patterns and resultant weather phenomena. That includes “stuck” weather, i.e., systems that come into an area and stall for days on end. Those seem to be related to the slowing, bulging, dipping jet stream. That in turn is related to the well-documented, rapid warming of the Arctic.

Our response? Take a deep sigh, and check those “stages” above.

Animated States of Income Inequality

There’s nothing like a moving picture to tell a story. Check this Washington Post animation. Despite bizarre color choices, it depicts how income inequality has grown in the past 33 years across the continental US. Intriguing. Makes me want to learn more by watching the most recent Moyers and Company installment, featuring an extended interview with former Labor Secretary Robert Reich. As you probably know, he is one of the major advocates on behalf of economic justice. Here is the trailer for the movie Reich and Moyers discuss, Inequality for All – about to be released. And if all that makes you want to explore where you fit into the economic puzzle, NPR’s Marketplace has a new interactive data game – Income Upshot. You know you want to try it. Just enter your income and zip code, and prepare for some eye-opening facts. Then, compare your situation with such real-life scions as Warren Buffett and Jamie Dimon, and even fictional folk like Homer Simpson and Marge Gunderson. Remember her? (Think “wood chipper.”)  And then learn even more about the financial crisis – which has served to further push the extremes of income inequality – at this list of documentaries posted by Moyers. I am sure they are all worthwhile, but from experience I can strongly recommend An Inside Job.

Greenhouse Generators

Here is a quick check on sources of greenhouse gases that are accumulating in the atmosphere – carbon dioxide and methane for two. One finding is a bit surprising – and seems easy to influence. The other is not surprising at all. Good luck influencing that one.

Shut Up and Sing?

This pictorial tribute makes me want to buy more recordings from all of these outspoken musical artists. Well, most of them anyway.

Help the Oceans Clean Themselves – A Boy’s Bright Idea

A video like Boyat Slat’s TedX Talk is enough to give an old environmentalist hope for the future. His bright idea offers a solution to a seemingly insoluble problem that is a product of our modern throwaway life – the Pacific garbage patch.

“The more we exploit nature, the more our options are reduced, until we have only one: to fight for survival.”

Morris K. Udall

 

Contributed links to this posting – Bonnie Blodgett, Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 9/15/13

15 09 2013

Arctic Refreeze + Slow Hurricane Season = Climate Change Bunk? //

It’s all the rage. The Arctic icepack will not set a new minimum record this year. It is already refreezing, fast. Those facts have climate science deniers energized. For instance, one of the most prominent of all the climate change denial sites has charts and graphs galore, telling this story that apparently proves climate change is not happening. This site has run pretty much the same story the last two years – see 2012 and 2011 entries. And it is not just pundits and bloggers – here is an established British news source with the same story.

True unbelievers in climate science take some kind of comfort, I guess, in news like the Arctic ice returning, plus this year’s near-record late start to the Atlantic hurricane season. Here is a balanced view of that hurricane situation, from Time magazine. Cherry-picked data serves as potent fuel for fantastical stories, as Rush Limbaugh regularly proves. And just as monthly Arctic ice stats serve some deniers, so have some other deniers seized on the late hurricane start as evidence that climate change activists are alarmists, to be ignored. Note – Taylor is a prime author for the oil-fueled Heartland Institute.

This is all familiar territory. It follows an established script. First, assert falsely that climate change as explained by scientists and science journalists is a perfectly linear process. Support that position with a few quotes, preferably speculative ones, by one or more of your demons – Al Gore or Bill McKibben, just to name two. Then, report your supportive data which undermines that inaccurate depiction of climate science. So you and the forces of do-nothingness win. Or do you?

These facts can’t be challenged. We pump 90 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every day. The current atmospheric carbon dioxide reading is 395 parts per million, compared to preindustrial levels of about 280. Both the daily and cumulative numbers continue to rise, with chaotic consequences that cannot be precisely predicted.

 

So what is happening now? In the hurricane realm, there are several possibilities. First, as Chris Mooney reports, climate change may actually reduce hurricanes. Of course, thanks to sea rise resulting from warmer oceans and melting ice sheets and glaciers, those hurricanes that do occur will have a head start. And with all the uncertainty, it is also possible that this season’s late start could itself be an anomaly.

As for the alleged return of the Arctic to its long-term solid, frozen status, don’t count on it. Time will prove the denialists wrong. It is only a matter of how fast things happen. For instance, the decidedly conservative, consensus-driven Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change comes out with its latest forecast in two weeks. Leaked information points to more certainty than ever. And though some evidence points to a lull in the temperature rise, our emission-driven acidification of the oceans proceeds. The Seattle Times’ Craig Welch put together a comprehensive article on acidification that includes several imbedded videos. And as for those who persist in their denial of scientific facts and projections, thus paralyzing policy, they will be justly recognized. As this Truthout piece suggests, we might think of them as the Dr. Kevorkians of the planet. Call it pignorance-assisted suicide.

 

Extremes in Two Mismatched Pairs

So the relationship between hurricanes and manmade climate change is unclear and hotly debated, and the ongoing experiment in liquefying the Arctic is crucial in its effect on weather patterns, not so crucial in sea rise. That’s because the ice, old and new alike, is already floating on the sea.

For a clear view of our climate-changed future, look to extremes today that are part of well-predicted trends. First there are increasingly common weather extremes. The Yosemite Rim fire, just about contained, is one example of an enhanced fire season, driven by higher temperatures and persistent drought. The latest shocking example is the horrific flooding and mudslides around Boulder, Colorado. As of this writing, four are confirmed dead, with hundreds unaccounted for. This disaster is caused by a triple-whammy series of drought, wildfire and finally, the knockout punch of monsoon-like storms that come and stay, dumping months or years worth of rain on the same sun-baked spot. Here are two videos from the Boulder environs – from Salina and Boulder itself. (Scroll down for the Boulder video.) Subhankar Banerjee effectively makes the case for climate change in the Colorado floods. And with the mangled jet stream causing all sorts of mayhem in weather patterns, Boulder-like events could be soon coming to a creek, stream or river near you.

And then there is the melting that really matters – the head-for-the-hills variety. That would be ice that resides on land, until it melts that is and slides into the rising sea. Two extreme locations, two similar stories. First there is Greenland, whose ice is described here by MPR meteorologist Paul Huttner as a “stick of butter in a hot pan.” In other words, it does not move at all for awhile, but then really starts to slip along seaward. Be sure to watch the short video on Greenland’s Mega Canyon. But what about the granddaddy of all ice sheets, Antarctica? If you guessed “accelerated melting, you get the extra credit points. Read here about research at the Pine Island Glacier, being undermined by warming ocean water. Here is 9/15 update from NPR on the same research. Did you catch the possible sea rise there? Six feet? See for yourself how that matters in this terrific interactive map from Climate Central.

So all of this manmade chaos and disruption really matters. But does it matter enough to motivate meaningful changes in energy and greenhouse gas policy? Not yet. But these groups are working hard to wake us up and tip the balance toward adaptation and sustainability – 350.org, the Climate Reality Project and Citizens Climate Lobby.

 

The Magical Techno Fix

This longstanding idea is often a slam at doomsayers of old – Thomas Malthus – or of more recent vintage – Paul Ehrlich. The idea is this – the earth’s capacity for human occupation is pretty much unlimited, nigh infinite. Hogwash, most ecologists say. But those who really believe in our technical ingenuity (and don’t much give a damn about our fellow travelers on this orb, i.e. any life form that is not human) persist in their sacred faith in technological innovation. Seldom in recent times has this view been given a more articulate or narrowly myopic presentation than in this Erle C. Ellis article in the New York Times. The problems that Ellis ignores or summarily dismisses in this column are too numerous to mention, but he does make at least one true statement – “In moving toward a better Anthropocene, the environment will be what we make it.” To which I would reply with words borrowed from Colin Powell: “If you break it, you own it.”

We have a lot of repairing to do, with or without technological wizardry. And to be fair, there is much more to Ellis’s ideas than this single article would indicate. See the linked video here.

As for the big picture, there is much to learn in National Geographic’s study of the world’s continued population growth. I also like the education and activism being done by Growthbusters, World Population Balance and the Population Connection. The more the merrier? No chance. The best strategy – educate the world’s women and support their family planning choices.

 

Plant It, and They Will Come?

We have invested much time and sweat in recent years replacing swaths of lawn with wild-looking native and rain gardens. Until this year, we attracted droves of large butterflies, including varieties of swallowtails and of course the lord of them all, monarchs. This year, we have seen exactly three swallowtails and not many more monarchs. In addition, our abundant milkweed shows no evidence of monarch eggs. An isolated, unfortunate incident? Not on your life.

This Minnesota Public Radio interview with the University of Minnesota’s Karen Oberhauser fingers two closely-related culprits – neo-nicotinoid pesticides, and modern factory agriculture’s penchant for decimating “unwanted” plants between the rows. That includes of course milkweed. She offers two remedies – plant more milkweed (maybe it will work for you) and be careful when buying garden plants from nurseries, who may have treated the plants with those magical modern poisons. But all of that means little when our government allows chemical companies such as Bayer and Monsanto to continue this campaign against the natural world. Congress has the power to stop this, if its members would for once think of the common good rather than their corporate sponsors.

 

A Hypocrisy Interview

I find that I have had the conversation described in this little article before. It serves to prove a long-held theory of mine. That is, that any ideology that purports to have all, or even most of, the answers to all the problems begins to look like a dogma, a religion. Magical thinking, that is. Unreal. Fantasy. Enjoy the script.

 

1227 Facts

There is a difference between trivia and curious, even meaningful facts. This is why I waste no time on trivia contests and collections, but love, for example Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me and the Harpers Index. This is precisely why a new book hit my reading list. Two of the three authors of 1227 Quite Interesting Facts to Blow Your Socks Off appeared on NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, interviewed by the great Scott Simon. Work is more dangerous than war, the most shoplifted book in the United States is the Bible, and there is an actual word for an affliction that awards the sufferer with feet the size of umbrellas. But the universe is not shaped like a bumbershoot. Try a vuvuzela. Enough said.

 

Shooting Each Other Some Love

Thanks to comic Sarah Silverman, we can fittingly celebrate two recent recall election victories by the fear-fueled National Rifle Association in Colorado. She has a modest proposal to make the country even “safer.”

 

Diplomacy Wins, for Now

Bill Moyers’ commentary highlights the power of public opinion in recent events concerning Syria. Collective common sense. What a concept.

 

“The great challenge of the twenty-first century is to raise people everywhere to a decent standard of living while preserving as much of the rest of life as possible.”
Edward O. Wilson

 

Contributed links to this posting – Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN





IBI Watch 8/25/13

25 08 2013

Unseasonable and Unreasonable //

If you follow climate change news carefully, and I hope you do, you know that an important event looms. That would be the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).  The report is due in September. Though denialists have branded this organization as a club of worry-wart, alarmist exaggerators, the truth is that it is a consensus-bound body, which adheres to conservative protocols.

So it is fair to say that IPCC projections tend toward the low end of the effects of our uncontrolled experiment in atmosphere transformation. That said, let’s see what is on tap, based on some early releases of findings (shared by Chris Mooney of Mother Jones). Nothing much to worry about, folks. Substantial melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea rise of five to ten meters, runaway ocean acidification. So what? This blog post by the Guardian’s John Abraham suggests that contrarians will have no choice but join the consensus and stop fighting policy to deal with the threat.

One thing is clear. The changes predicted by IPCC based on current trends are not some far-off theoretical possibility. They are happening right now. There of course is accelerating Arctic melting – clear for all to see. And there is that persistent drought in the American Southwest, dramatically lowering the flow on the Colorado River and showing the newly famous “bathtub ring” at Hoover Dam’s Lake Mead. Thirteen years and counting; bound to end any day now, eh? And let’s not forget the western fire season, now in full swing and threatening state budgets (and even the water supply of San Francisco).  A less dramatic, though arguably more universal, phenomenon has overtaken weather patterns – “stuck weather.” Though this can mean weeks of beautiful weather, or a hellacious heat wave that just won’t quit, it all results from the same condition – a weak, meandering jet stream caused by a vastly warmer Arctic. We are currently switching gears right now in Minnesota from a warm, settled regime into a possible record heat wave (for this late summer season) – as Paul Douglas reports in his consistently excellent weather and climate blog.

So though climate change evidence becomes clearer every day, I remain skeptical about significant action in the near term, for two important reasons. The first is the fact that a well-funded, powerful, persistent campaign of pignorant (pretend-ignorant) anti-science has lulled a significant slice of the public into somnolence. Adam Frank – author of About Time – chronicles our pathetic decline into science denial in this fine column he wrote for the New York Times – summarized here and commented on by Tree Hugger’s Chris Tackett.  (See a glimmer of hope there in the planned reboot of the TV series Cosmos.) The second is the pathetic power structure that has taken hold in modern America. With the GOP in the (gerrymandered) majority in the House of Representatives right now, this is the pignorant posse that passes for leadership of the House Science(!) Committee. It is so bad that I mainly agree with these two assessments of the cause and results of our spending decades dealing with denialists’ posturing rather than accepting the science and moving ahead. The first is by Jeff Schweitzer and the second by Robert Parry. Neither pulls punches in calling out the real engineers of today’s alarmingly science-dumb state of affairs among the public. I especially identify with Frank’s description of his earlier mistake in judgment – that public awareness and understanding of scientific reality would only grow. Sorry.

Surely, this state of affairs can’t go on indefinitely. And in fact a recent media shift may point to some hope from an unlikely source – the much-maligned (in some circles) Al Jazeera. Sure, the burst of coverage on the newly realigned network far surpasses typical American coverage because of the dismally low standard.  But we need hope on waking up the public, and allies of all stripes are valuable. And of course this is a global problem, calling especially for leadership on the part of the wealthy industrialized nations. Here is a call for action on the part of the United Kingdom’s David Cameron. And despite continued intransigence on the part of the pignorant right in the United States, prominent activists see hope for action. In this interview, former Vice President Al Gore sees a tipping point in public opinion based largely on growing consensus on the connection between ever-wilder weather and our continued dumping of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Gore holds onto his optimism despite interviewer Ezra Klein’s tough questioning.

This is no time for giving in to complacency and inevitability. Active groups such as the Climate Reality Project and 350.org are doing no such thing. And the single most helpful step – maybe even more helpful than killing the Keystone XL pipeline – would be enacting a carbon fee system. That’s the goal of the Citizens Climate Lobby, endorsed by former NASA scientist James Hansen.

One Observance that Really Matters . . .

There is a big buzz in Washington this weekend, with tens of thousands crowding the National Mall to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream speech. And that great, resounding speech was only one of the highlights of the civil rights movement, as this collection posted by Bill Moyers reminds us. But this is far from a mere celebration of important history. That is because these battles, sadly, must be fought over again. Here is a speech from John Lewis, calling out the Supreme Court on new efforts mainly (but not exclusively) in the South to suppress the poor and minority vote. Recently, Attorney General Eric Holder has put welcome attention on this crucial area. But remember – this won’t be easy.

And Two More that Really Should Matter

Not that most of us have heard of these, but Earth Overshoot Day shot past largely unnoticed the other day. That day marks the day when humanity exhausts the earth’s annual capacity to absorb our carbon-generating body blows. Fortunately, groups like Growthbusters and World Population Balance were keeping count. Those groups focus on the macro scale and the driving force behind environmental trouble – the unfettered and unrelenting growth in human population. The other recent occasion – World Orangutan Day – focuses on a micro scale – destruction of the habitat of one of our most amazing and beloved primate cousins. The saddest thing about this destruction is its driving force – clearing rainforest to make way for palm oil plantations so we in the comfortable developed world can buy cheaper soap (check the labels) and all manner of processed food products. Learn more and take action.

Boomer Warrior – An Ally

My Facebook friend Rolly Montpellier of Toronto has been developing his Boomer Warrior newsletter. He posts a variety of environmental sustainability pieces on his impressive site, featuring a range of writers, including, on occasion, this blogger.

Three Random Blows against the “Unsustainable Empire”

First – how much do bike commuters save the government? The piece comes from Australia, but is relevant everywhere. Second, who could ever imagine a victory such as this in a battle between microbrew and Big Oil? And finally – further news of the growth of renewable energy in “sunny” Germany.

“I am a person who is unhappy with things as they stand. We cannot accept the world as it is. Each day we should wake up foaming at the mouth because of the injustice of things.” ― Hugo Claus

Contributed links to this posting – Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN