IBI Watch 12/15/13

15 12 2013

Careful with that Focus //

In photography, a macro lens in skilled hands produces eye-opening results. By zooming in on details, we can get a glimpse of a whole other world – think of pictures like these. But in the climate debate, the metaphorical macro lens produces results of an entirely different type. If you have a story to tell, particularly an anti-science, fossil-fueled fairy tale of “everything is fine, so shut up,” you can whip out that macro lens and find all sorts of material for your narrative.

The latest is the dramatic news that a new all-time low temperature may have been recorded in Antarctica. Sure, the reading is a bit tainted – satellite-collected, three years old and all that – but it is big news of a sort. And if you are telling the “climate change is a hoax” story, it is something to capitalize on. Here’s a post from my favorite denialist blog – though the site does not overtly beat the drum on this new evidence, it is easy to surmise why the story appears at all. A new all-time low casts doubt on the manmade climate change story, from that macro view. And then there is wintry weather cropping up in unexpected places, and politically beneficial (to the likes of James Inhofe and Company) places. And right here in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, it has been cold, no doubt about it. We have already had a series of overnight sub-zero low temps, and on several days the high barely crept above zero.  So many are assuming the return of the bracing winters of yore, and possibly imagining that well, maybe all that climate change stuff really isn’t all that big a story. Maybe it is not true at all.

The Antarctic low is the most macro of all information. Go to a slightly wider lens, and you see what is really happening – Phil Plait’s nicely illustrated blog post on Slate tells the wide-angle story. Despite isolated record-low temps and scattered colder-than-average spots, the continuing story at both poles is one word – melt. And far-flung or persistent wintry weather tempts us back toward the business-as-usual, all-is-fine approach, especially if we have bought the myth of climate change as a linear, lock-step, steady warming process. But that is foolish – all that cold and snowy weather far from the poles is itself a consequence of all our greenhouse gas belching – see here. And here in the Twin Cities, of course winter is cold. In fact, it is so cold that most Minnesotans, native or adopted, spend the better part of December – March complaining about it or headed for the airport. But the wide-angle focus is this – the last time the low temperature hit -20F was January 16, 2009. Historically – -20F to -30F is the annual bottom-out temperature in these parts, or was anyway. And lest you think this is simply the masochistic raving of a crazy winter sports fan (well OK so it is, but there is more), this is the real evidence of a long-term shift in the climate, and it has major long-term consequences. We can always count on Paul Douglas for the long view and the science backing it up. Please view his blog, and check the blog entry “Blissfully Numb.” No better irony than this. Sure it is cold in a few places on the globe, including the tip of my nose, but get a look at how much red (above normal) there is all around. And a global comparison from November of this year sure puts that satellite-collected Antarctic record in context.

And of course the biggest picture of all is this, and for the foreseeable future, the only way on that number is up. The only question is how far and how fast.

The first lesson here of course – beware wide-angle judgments emerging from macro lenses. The other lesson is let’s do something about it. Here is a recent recommendation, and an organization dedicated to the cause. And one more for good measures, like a carbon fee and dividend.

 

Newtown Echoes

It has been a hard week for listening to the radio and reading the papers. On the radio, we hear the voices of grieving parents of the children gunned down in the ghastly and senseless Sandy Hook Elementary massacre. And in the papers, we see again the faces of all those young lives snuffed out. What have we learned and done? Sadly, not nearly enough.

For one thing, the bloody toll continues. Watch this short Mother Jones video and dig into the investigative report. It is easy to see that it is only a matter of time before the next massacre. The NRA’s power to stymie efforts at reasonable regulation is undiminished. At the state level, the view is not quite so bleak.

There is a lot of depth on America’s violent culture in this interview by Bill Moyers with cultural historian Richard Slotkin. I had never seen the inside of the violent video games that Slotkin samples in the interview – even one specifically modeled on the Sandy Hook massacre. Warning – disgusting, shocking, hard to watch if you have any imagination or empathy.

A worthy group fights on for sensible gun regulation.

 

Looking Ahead – the Next Four Decades (Guest Post by Desmond Berghofer)

Guest blogger Desmond Berghofer provides a comprehensive look at socioeconomic and environmental trends looking out to 2052. He aptly notes that so much of this emanates from uncontrolled population growth. Interesting stuff. This post is from the BoomerWarrior site, the work of Toronto’s Rolly Montpellier. Rolly sometimes features my work. Berghofer also has his own blog, worth checking out.

 

At Last, Volcker Rules

What’s this? A step in the direction of sensible bank regulation? Believe.

A Sunny Forecast

Look out Germany, US solar is coming.

Play It Dumb or Smart

It’s reality or magical thinking. No other choice. Two cities diverge on the path to planning for climate change’s inevitable sea rises. Ideology is a powerful thing, for better or worse. OK, mainly for worse.

 

Feed Your Mind (Or Someone Else’s) – the IBI Watch Reading List

For years, I have threatened to post my recommended book list for titles connected to this blog. Drumroll, please. Well, all right, skip the percussion. But please take a look. Note especially my “top five” recommendations. Look for the bold type most strongly recommended items. I endorse the entire list of course, but I guarantee that anyone reading any of my top five for the first time will vastly expand their world view.

 

“Peace cannot be achieved through violence, it can only be attained through understanding.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Contributed links or content to this posting – Desmond Berghofer, Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN

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