IBI Watch 9/29/13

29 09 2013

Too Late or Not Too Late?

The latest assessment from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) offers plenty of evidence for both arguments – that it is already past the time where we can solve our manmade climate crisis, or that we still have time to mitigate and reverse it. But some things are clear in all the projections – human activity is altering the climate, the trends are not favorable, and we are pushing the climate towards the point where it will be too late to do anything.

The new IPCC report – its fifth and first since 2007 – certainly offers some openings for denialists. It acknowledges the fact that our uncontrolled experiment in altering the climate with our greenhouse gases is not a linear process. It also fine-tunes some predictions from previous assessments, and in some cases suggests that prior predictions – at least for now through 2100 – may have been too steep. But for all but the most die-hard denialists (think of tobacco executives in the 1960s or maybe of Baghdad Bob as US forces invaded Iraq in 2003), the message is clearer than ever – we are steadily raising atmospheric carbon dioxide, which is warming the planet and altering the oceans and the entire planetary climate system.

Thanks to various media outlets, getting the gist of the latest from this conservative, consensus-bound body does not require poring through hundreds of footnoted pages. Here is an overview pdf. It runs more than 30 pages, but is actually quite easy to surf. Just look for the orange-shaded paragraphs. When you do, you will see that the report contains little good news. The vaunted (by denialists) “slowdown” or “pause” in warming noticed over the past 15 years? It’s a natural variation, and an indication that the heat is being absorbed by the deep oceans. (Want to know more about ocean heating? See here.)Not all the recent heat is ocean-bound, of course (only about 90 percent!), but all that heat will eventually warm the atmosphere. And even with the ocean’s shielding the atmosphere – for now – from the most serious heating, we still have the dramatic retreat of glaciers, ice sheets and the Arctic sea ice.

To learn more, try one or more of these:

A summary from the NPR blog

A report at the Economist’s blog site

A summary reported by Reuters

A fine summary posted by Joe Romm at the Climate Progress site

A set of graphics posted at Climate Central

There is always another choice – learn less, think magically, insert head into sand or other dark space. This Buzzfeed collection of familiar denialist assertions can help in that regard. It even has brief video samples attached for entertainment value. And of course you can read variants of those and others in the comment section following virtually all postings on climate change. In fact, another came to my attention recently – the one about human activity (the 90 million tons of CO2 we send skyward every day) being dwarfed by volcanoes. Here is a fact-based debunker of that canard. And all those comments bring up one of the challenges in moving policy on climate and energy in a sustainable direction. Public perception of science is found to be affected by all the rants of trolls and thinkers who know more than the world’s scientists. Though I am not particularly fond of Popular Science – they don’t cover my favorite issues anywhere near as often as Scientific American, Discover and National Geographic – I want to relay  a step that magazine felt necessary. That is, remove the comment platform for the anti-scientists, “skeptics” and denialists. It really has come to that. And reader comments are not the only source of anti-science propaganda. When it comes to media, we have to consider the source, particularly these oily headwaters.

There are people who are committed to climate science and climate policy, and then there is Kumi Naidoo. The executive director of Greenpeace – an organization I support – appeared on Moyers and Company this week. A veteran of daring protests that have led to grave physical danger and arrests, this is someone who puts his personal safety on the line in defense of a livable planet. I like his rhyming mantra – “Leave the coal in the hole, and the oil in the soil,” and also his call to action – “If we can mobilize trillions to bail out banks, bankers, bonuses, surely we can mobilize much less than that to deal with the climate crisis.” Naidoo’s take on the “too late/not too late” question is also right on. That is, it is too late for people already in the bull’s eye of sea rise and ice melt. We need to act and act forcefully to make sure it does not get too late for all humanity. That time is just about upon us.

A “Ted Talk” that Speaks Volumes

You may be able to find a complete recording of the recent “Ted-athon” on the Senate floor, but you will need to order several pizzas and a case of No-Doz to make it through. Instead, I prescribe Jon Stewart’s two-part sampling of this spectacularly off-tune solo hypocrisy. In part one, Stewart hits the “high” points of Senator Ted Cruz’s not-a filibuster. And in part two, he latches onto the senator’s cultural contribution, in which he uses the podium to read Dr. Seuss’ famous Green Eggs and Ham, allegedly to his daughter. Ten minutes of hilarious satire or 21 hours of glazed eyes and nausea. Choose wisely. And remember, this guy wants to be president.

I have a couple of points to make here. First, this display continues a not-so-proud Republican tradition of having a tin ear for culture. Remember Michele Bachmann and American Girl? How about Ronald Reagan and Born in the USA? And though it was not as public, my favorite story in this regard is President George W Bush’s alleged affinity for the songs of Creedence Clearwater Revival. The question is, did he understand or even listen to Fortunate Son? Yes, as Snopes points out, the song was not about President W but was there ever a more fortunate son? Second, the good Senator seems to have forgotten that Theodore Geisel (i.e. Dr. Seuss) was a staunch liberal. And most important of all, what is the point of that immortal kids’ book in the first place? Try it, you’ll like it. Uber-blogger Tom Degan makes that point in his imitable way right here.

There are two things I would like you to remember here, as we head, seemingly inexorably, toward yet another pigheaded government shutdown. First, Senator Ted Cruz, playing to the Tea Party extremists who increasingly control his party, is a health-care hypocrite of the first order. (That’s not saying he is alone in that regard.) And second, keep in mind that this tea-addled majority in the House, that is willing to risk shutting down the government, and not long after that, defaulting on the debts that the US government accrued on both Republican and Democratic watch, is a gerrymandered, phony majority. So get this – an extremist minority within a party that is actually a minority itself is acting completely contrary to the will of the American people. And this is a group that purportedly opposes tyranny. Folks, you just can’t make this up.

Nerds Can’t Dance

Or maybe they just shouldn’t. When I watched this video of Bill Nye the Science Guy dancing and ultimately tripping up, injured, on Dancing with the Stars, I was reminded of some movie scene. It was the hair – Tom Hulce, playing Mozart in one of my all-time favorite flicks, Amadeus. But I digress. The Science Guy’s knee injury looks painful but, thank goodness, not career threatening. Get right quick, Bill. We need you to do more stuff like this, this and this. And hey, break a leg. Or maybe not.

Food Rescued

It’s a downright scandal. Consider how much energy goes into creating our food, and then imagine this – 40 percent of food in America is wasted. News features recently have highlighted that shameful fact. Here is a fine example from the Los Angeles Times. The former president of Trader Joe’s has a better idea. It’s a combination store/restaurant that will offer food items that are just past those expiration dates, but still usable. Though Peter Sagal had a good old time with the idea on Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, here is hoping it sells.

Fix the Problem – Ten Ways

If asked to name the one problem to solve in order to create far-reaching, cascading positive change, I know what my answer would be. Get corporate hands off the levers of power. Their grip has been strengthening in recent years, thanks in no small part to the infamous Citizens United decision by the corporatocratic Supreme Court. Gar Alperovitz and Keane Bhatt have a wonderful, thought-provoking piece on Truthout. How many of these have you tried? It’s not too late . . . yet.

“I conceive that the land belongs to a vast family of which many are dead, few are living, and countless numbers are still unborn.” – A Chieftain from Nigeria

Contributed links to this posting – Allyson Harper

 

Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: