IBI Watch 7/28/13

28 07 2013

Downstream Cleanup //

How many times have you visited a beautiful natural space – wilderness area, national park, nature preserve – and seen the calling cards of fellow visitors? Bottle caps, wrappers, plastic water bottles spoiling paths, shores and rest areas?  What have you done? A confession from me is in order here. I have mainly muttered something like “pigs,” “slobs,” and moved on. After all, I am careful, I don’t toss rubbish about, they hire people to clean up after pigs, why should it be my job? These are just a few of the many stories to tell yourself about why picking up is not your job. But they are all wrong.

As of this vacation weekend, I have started a new practice. Whenever I visit such a place, I will bring along a bag to pick up after my piggish fellow users of these areas. I did just that today while visiting a Connecticut state park with my brother-in-law. I must say, it felt more than a little satisfying, and I still got to mutter “pigs,” “slobs,” and move on.

What got me thinking along these lines was this plea for an end to disposable living, delivered in a TEDX Talk by Tim Silverwood. Of course, the North Pacific Gyre garbage patch – the diffuse soup of plastic waste that is only the largest of several around the world – has been well documented. Most prominent in my experience is Alan Weisman’s excellent The World Without Us. But Silverwood’s presentation provides new information, and video evidence of certain phenomena that, to be honest, I have been somewhat skeptical of. For instance, I have long been cutting up six-pack plastic rings, all the while wondering why. If you watch the presentation, you will see a particular critter that wishes someone, somewhere had made that cut.

All plastic waste on the loose ultimately floats downstream to the ocean, where it does unspeakable harm. But Silverwood’s main point is worth elaborating. Responsible handling of plastic waste is good – and cleaning up beaches, parks and all public spaces helpful – but all this is not nearly enough. We need to generate less of the stuff in the first place. That clearly takes more than individual responsibility. Good starts on this are plastic bag bans and bottle deposit laws.

And isn’t this just another example of a massive environmental challenge where individual action – making the right choices like driving less, cutting consumption, conserving energy – is the right thing to do, and helps, but will only make a mass difference if societal change can happen? Think of all the right-thinking people planting native gardens while Monsanto pesticides kill off pollinators, others driving Priuses while the icecaps melt, others making wise if costlier food choices while our entire system subsidizes unhealthy food and encourages sedentary lifestyles.

Annie Leonard’s series on The Story of Stuff connects all the dots concisely and even amusingly. And most recently she makes that vital connection between individual action and societal change in The Story of Change.

Positive change starts with individual action, but if it stops there, we will just feel a little better on the road to hell. For real change, it all really does come down to cutting corporate power over our system.

 

Extremes All Over

First, it is always a good time to expose hogwash. Sorry, Rush and Co., climate change has not halted or paused since 1998. What’s more, the Arctic is indeed turning into slush, as it has to an ever-increasing extent in recent years. And that great savior at the other end of the planet, the Antarctic ice cap that denialists have told us was stable, not to worry, it turns out, is not so stable.

And of course climate change’s effects are not limited to the poles. Far from it. Check this excellent MPR ClimateCast story on how forests are suffering a double whammy of pest infestation and devastating wildfires in a self-feeding cycle. As for that idea that planting more trees will solve the climate problem, think again – as this concise piece posted at the BURN Energy Journal site explains.

But the biggest extreme of all? That would be the extreme pignorance (pretend ignorance) practiced by well-paid, mostly Republican Congressmen and Senators these shameful past 25 years. We need real (not gerrymandered) and filibuster-proof majorities in both houses – majorities made up of legislators who respect science and tell it like it is. Thank God for Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont. He calls the whole pignorant lot of them out once again.

Time to listen to Bernie, and time to make carbon pay its way.

 

Supreme Hypocrisy

I must have needed one more reason to cement Justice Antonin Scalia at the top of my most reviled Supreme Court Justice list. The arrogant proponent of Constitutional Originalism (and the unacknowledged chief torch carrier for the corporatocracy) now makes a bizarre connection between his opponents and the engineers of the Holocaust. I guess there is always room for more reasons, needed or not. Was there ever a stronger argument for ending lifetime appointments?

 

See, I Told You So

Bonus points for any reader who knows that is the title of a book by America’s bigot-in-chief. More bonus points if you have steeled your will and made it through the Great Bloviator’s baloney. But this time, that phrase comes from an unexpected place – Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg. The subject – the Court’s recent decision to invalidate key parts of the 1965 Voting Rights Act (over liberal justices’ objections). Think of this as the GOP’s updated “Southern Strategy.” This time, it has the blessing of the highest court in the land.

 

It All Adds up to 200

A friend posted an interesting visual recently – a slide show showing what a 200-calorie serving of dozens of different foods looks like. This WiseGeek video runs three minutes, and tells the surprising story behind 200 calories.

 

“Special interests have blocked the transition to our renewable energy future. Instead of moving heavily into renewable energies, fossil fuel companies choose to spread doubt about global warming, just as tobacco companies discredited the link between smoking and cancer. Methods are sophisticated, including funding to help shape school textbook discussions of global warming. CEOs of fossil energy companies know what they are doing and are aware of the long-term consequences of continued business as usual. In my opinion, these CEOs should be tried for high crimes against humanity and nature.”

– James Hansen

 Contributed links to this posting –Mark Goldberg, Allyson Harper

 Blogger – Michael Murphy, St. Paul MN

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